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Galvanizing sustainability in construction


Andy Harrison of Wedge Group Galvanizing explores the key benefits galvanizing brings to sustainable construction, and highlights the growing number of techniques adopted by the galvanizing industry to further reduce the sector’s environmental impact


G


alvanizing has long been recognised as the most sustainable finishing process available to help the construction sector protect buildings against corrosion, with te recent emergence of a number of technological advances making the procedure even more environmentally friendly.


The growing focus on environmental considerations in architecture, coupled with the continuing need to find cost-effective and ethically conscious building solutions, has put sustainability at the top of the agenda in the construction sector. Hot dip galvanizing provides highly effective, durable and sustainable corrosion protection wherever steel is in


use, from the structural steelwork used as the framework for major building projects, right through to final flourishes such as gates and railings.


As steel is highly prone to rust – it’s estimated that worldwide, one tonne of steel turns to rust every 90 seconds – it is essential that the life of steel components is protected from corrosion for as long as possible.


Hot dip galvanizing protects steel from rusting. Clean steel components are immersed in molten zinc at a temperature of around 450 degrees until the temperature of the work is the same as the zinc.


During this process a series of alloy ADF OCTOBER 2018 WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


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