search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
38 Copper – the real thing


Despite an unrivalled heritage including use on some of our oldest buildings, continuing developments make copper and its alloys thoroughly modern and sustainable options for contemporary architecture, as Graeme Bell of Aurubis explains


ROYAL ACADEMY


Blue pre-patinated copper wraps two new performance spaces at Royal Academy of Music, London (Ian Ritchie Architects) Photo: Adam Scott


opper has seen a dramatic shift from its historic place in roofing to a leading role in today’s facades. Its flexibility offers exciting potential for a flexible skin covering architectural elements of all shapes with minimal constraints. Architects are experimenting with this design freedom, fired by the potential for complex forms enabled by CAD and BIM techniques.


C


Recycling & sustainability Adding to an exceptionally long-life, demonstrated over hundreds of years, copper requires no maintenance or decoration. As a lightweight and flexible covering, structural demands are reduced with lower carbon and ‘whole of life’ costs. Copper is also fully recyclable, utilising long-established practices – 97 per cent of copper in construction comes from recycling – and has other impressive sustainability and environmental credentials. With a melting point of 1083˚C and A1 (non-combustible material) fire classification to EN 13501-1, copper is


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


suitable for cladding tall buildings, using appropriate constructions. Low thermal movement also makes it appropriate for any climate and location, and it is non-toxic and safe to handle, as well as non-brittle and safe to work. Its inherent antimicrobial qualities make it ideal for ‘touch’ surfaces internally.


New techniques Traditionally, copper cladding and roofing utilised thin sheets or strips, with formed joints and fully supported by a substrate. But other techniques are also growing in popularity, such as copper shingles, panels pre-formed on two sides, and cassettes in squarer proportions with folded edges to all four sides. Copper is also being used to clad distinct elements such as fins, screens and brise-soleil. One of the most exciting developments today is experimentation with diverse forms, apart from flat rolled material. For example, copper can be pressed to provide surface textures and modulation, and perforated, expanded or woven as mesh for transparency.


ADF OCTOBER 2018


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52