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26 REVELSTOKE ROAD, LONDON


All images © Ben Blossom


The cladding will deepen to – and maintain – a darker orange colour, tying into the red bricks and tiles of the locality


this potential side-effect of achieving a space-efficient density level was one of the main concerns to be addressed at the planning stage. It was a key reason for ensuring the footprint followed the same lines as the rest of the street (other than the required alteration for the surgery), and for keeping the balconies inside that curtilage.


The future of housing The approach Architecture Initiative took for this site is something Shanley thinks London could do with more of, to address the acute need for housing. “As a company, we believe in densification,” he says. They recently worked on a report which


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


demonstrated that when looking at a traditional terraced house, a hectare of space will fit an average of 50 dwellings. However, by densifying the units as they have with this project, up to 220 dwellings can be fit into a hectare. In particular, the practice believes this is important in the suburban areas of the city – anywhere with residential developments of no more than four or five storeys. “This is basically what we were looking at with Revelstoke Road,” Shanley says. “There’s got to be a way of increasing the amount of homes available and so this was a way of doing it, making something fit in with the streetscape, but increasing density.” 


ADF OCTOBER 2018


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