search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
NEWS


What it takes to be a good elected official


Barbara Bowes, Legacy Bowes Y


es, it’s that time again…..municipal elections! It’s a crazy time that sees new candidates coming forward


with their ideas and established council- lors defending their accomplishments and setting goals for a new term. But, just why do people run for public office? After all, it’s sometimes seen as a thankless job and it certainly takes up a lot of personal time attending meeting after meeting after meeting! Let’s face it, some candidates are indeed


altruistic and issues-driven and believe they can work for a specific cause that helps to improve their community. Still, others are ego-driven and strive to gain a spotlight that helps them to “be some- thing” rather than focusing on “doing” something. And of course there are those candidates who believe they know better than anyone else and so they run for the purpose of wanting to “fix” the way their council has been running. Yet, it doesn’t take long before a suc-


cessful candidate learns that being a “lone wolf” doesn’t work. Not only that, they’ll quickly learn there is a process to decision making and that thumping one’s fist on the table and crying foul against a fellow councillor only serves to alienate their colleagues as well as the public. If you really think about it, being an


elected councillor, mayor or reeve is some- what like being in a marriage. Tere will be a get-acquainted period, a transition pe- riod from private citizen to public official and transition from being an independent voice to being part of a team. Yet with so many different viewpoints


and goals, different personalities and dif- ferent communication styles, new council- lor teamwork is not easy but teamwork is what our communities expect. Not only that, in today’s age with fast-changing conditions and tight financial constraints, collaboration between council members as well as other regional councils is key. So just what does collaboration mean?


Collaboration means working together to achieve a goal. It requires leadership on the part of every elected official and per- sonal actions that demonstrate a shared purpose. Successful elected of f icials


thinkers. By this, I mean that they must look beyond their own borders and to think regionally. Just as I said about indi- vidual councillors, a “lone wolf” council also no longer works. Today, elected of- ficials and their council need to think regionally because they can no longer exist in isolation. Tis requires big-picture thinking and collaborative planning for shared services and/or revenue sharing where possible. In my view, elected officials who are true


collaborators are a special kind of person and have the following personality traits: Relationship focused – deliberate about


Barbara Bowes.


place their focus on gaining consensus in problem-solving, they invite participation in discussions and they respect other’s viewpoints even when they disagree. These leaders freely and respectfully


share information with their colleagues and ensure that everyone has the same information. They negotiate and work towards finding a middle ground while at the same time reflecting on different pos- sible alternatives. While collaboration means hard work


on the part of elected officials, there are numerous benefits to both individuals as well as the community. First of all, collabo- ration leads to effective and more rapid decision making resulting in municipal projects staying on schedule and meeting budget requirements. Collaborative plan- ning at the initiation of projects results in fewer errors and increased success. In addition, research shows that collabora- tion leads to more creative approaches to community challenges because all of the talents at the decision-making table are being utilized in the discussions. Finally, when citizens see collaboration working at the council level, it gives them confidence, they can see that goals and objectives are focused on community needs and that results are being achieved. Collaboration builds community trust. Elected officials in the upcoming Octo- ber 2018 elections need to be big-picture


 Growing as a group Continued from page 1


has demonstrated in running the very successful Peak of the Market where all parts of the industry must work together, our local leaders must also continue to work in a coordinated fashion to ensure the success of the entire region. As well as being a great business leader,


CONTENTS


Your vote 2018 - make it count ..................................................1 Election 2018: who's runnning across the region .................1 Growing as a group .................................................................. 1, 2 What it takes to be a good elected official .............................2 Reconciliation in action................................................................3 Connecting to opportunity .........................................................3 No beef, all bouquets ..................................................................3


Private industry and RM of Rosser collaborating to move industrial development forward in CentrePort ..................4


Get Manitoba on the road to trade, and to a better deal for municipalities ..............................................................4


Energy and sustainable development .....................................5 Winnipeg Metropolitan Region outlook 2018 ......................6 Recipe: Apple potato pancakes ..................................................6 2 Regional Times


Canadian fertilizer industry working with Manitoba growers to reduce environmental impacts, increase profitability ....7


RM of St. Clements – the place to be .......................................8 RM of St. Andrews – lean, clean and green ............................9 The truth about women and strokes ....................................10 Connecting communities with fiber .....................................11


Everything you need to know about legally accessing medical cannabis in Canada .................................................13


Puzzles ...........................................................................................13 Things are looking up at the airport ......................................14 Paddle your own canoe .............................................................15 Hooked on fishing 2018 ...........................................................15 Puzzle answers ............................................................................15


winnipegmetroregion.ca


Peak of the Market is also a good corporate citizen by working to make our commu- nity a much better place to live, work and play. Each year over 1.5 million dollars’ worth of produce is donated to Winnipeg Harvest ensuring everyone has access to fresh produce.


As the Winnipeg Metro Region con-


tinues to grow with people, potatoes and parsnips, it is a good reminder that if you want to go fast go alone, but if you want to go far and make a difference, lettuce all go together!


building relationships and breaking down the walls between people and/or organiza- tions while getting to know as many people as possible in the entire community. Always diplomatic – focused on build-


ing relationships based on mutual trust and respect, and focused on preserving the dignity of the other people in the con- versation. Curious and good listeners – engaging


in listening and asking good questions in order to get to the root cause of an issue and help get to effective long-term solutions. Team focused – inviting participation in


discussions and respecting other’s com- ments. Good collaborators help others express themselves by reframing issues to facilitate understanding. Focus on right goals – staying focused


on the strategic plan and its goals and objectives to ensure community needs remain the priority. Big picture thinkers connect the dots, create a vision and bring the right people to the table to ensure suc- cessful results. With municipal elections on the hori-


zon, this is your opportunity to vote for candidates that will take on the responsi- bility of guiding change and building both collaborative councils and collaboration between regions – a necessary element in building a strong, prosperous and sustain- able metro region. Barbara J. Bowes is a former elected


school trustee, and an executive coach to elected officials. She is also the president of Legacy Bowes Group, a well known HR and management consulting firm in Winnipeg. She can be contacted at barb@ legacybowes.com


Vol. 1, No. 3 SPRING 2018 Autumn 2018


Regional Times is a quarterly publication of the Winnipeg Metropolitan Region.


Unit 1 - 1749 Portage Ave., Winnipeg, Manitoba R3J 0E6


Phone: 1-204-989-2048


Web: winnipegmetroregion.ca Email: info@wmregion.ca


FOLLOW US ONLINE


Strategic Initiative Concept Dorothy Dobbie dorothy@pegasuspublications.net


Consulting Editor Bill Burfoot


bill@pegasuspublications.net


Art Direction and Layout Karl Thomsen karl@pegasuspublications.net


President Ian Leatt ian.leatt@pegasuspublications.net


Contributors Michael Badejo, Barbara Bowes, Diane Gray, Christine Houde, Laura LaPalme, Chris Lorenc, Kelly McCarthy, Larry McIn- tosh, Duncan Morrison, Marshall Posner, Aaditya Raman, Colleen Sklar, Courtlyn Suszko, Winnipeg Metro Region News Desk.


Advertising & Sponsorships Jennifer David 204-989-2048 jennifer@wmregion.ca


Produced by: Pegasus Publications Inc. 300-1600 Ness Avenue Winnipeg, MB R3J 3W7 1-888-680-2008 www.pegasuspublications.net


ISSN 2560-8894


Distributed throughout the Winnipeg Metropolitan Region. If you would like bulk copies of this publication contact us at 1-204-989-2048 or jennifer@wmregion.ca


Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: 300-1600 Ness Avenue Winnipeg, MB R3J 3W7 Phone: (204) 940-2700 or 1-888-680-2008


Canadian Publications mail product Sales Agreement #40027604


The publisher reserves the right to withdraw any introductory-free circulation at any time without notice. Reproduction in whole or in part


is prohibited without permission in writing to the publisher. Unsolicited manuscripts and photographs should be addressed to The Editor, with an enclosed stamped self-addressed envelope for return.


Publisher buys all editorial rights and reserves the right to republish any material published.


Copyright © Pegasus Publications Inc. Autumn 2018


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16