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ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER


TAKING STOCK! Like many people, I wouldn’t describe myself as overly political, but I have somehow been pulled into this whole Brexit thing against my will and I don’t like it at all.


The whole mess reminds me of the time when I had the role of chief organiser of my little brother’s stag do thrust upon me.


I’d never had to organise one before, but I’d been to plenty and they just took care of themselves, right? Around 765 emails later asking for/begging for/demanding payment, receiving phone calls asking if I knew which brand of pillows they used in the hotel, text messages from one person saying that they ‘knew someone’ and could get us on the VIP list at all the best clubs and we were ready to go. Three were late, one made their own way there without letting me know and two never showed. As I write this, I am imagining whom in the government is represented by whom in all this. For your information, there was a guy who danced a little bit like Theresa May after he’d had a dozen pints of Stella and our version of Boris Johnson made it on the stag do but never made it back with the rest of us!


Last month, the Health Secretary issued instructions to the pharmaceutical industry in general in case of a ‘no-deal’ Brexit. Two of these instructions immediately caught my eye.


Pharmaceutical manufacturers were asked to hold an extra six weeks worth of medication than they usually do, to act as a buffer in case medication takes longer to reach us. As someone who deals with manufacturers that make us beg for adrenaline pens to stop children dying from anaphylactic shock, I don’t hold out much hope for a sudden benevolence transplant.


Pharmacies were instructed not to stockpile medication in an attempt to overcome any supply issues at a local level. We were in fact told that we’d be spoken to if we were found to be doing this. Firstly, we couldn’t realistically afford to hold more stock than we already do.


Secondly, this


stipulation suggests that medication is readily available for pharmacies to order (not true).


But thirdly, I very much


doubt that they would have a clue what any individual pharmacy orders. So, I’m ordering an extra box of every medication a day from each of our wholesalers from now until May!


NOT QUITE WHAT THE DOCTOR ORDERED! We are continually hearing that patients with ailments should visit their pharmacy before going anywhere else and on the whole, I think that this is a good thing. Being the link between the patient and their GP or A&E service is very important and hopefully we can help to reduce any pressures on the system with our knowledge and experience. If we are able to deal with conditions within our expertise, it is hoped that the other services will be able to better deal with cases that truly need them.


I’ve had some requests over the years that have somewhat overestimated my skills/insurance cover but I’ve tried to be as accommodating as possible. In the last few weeks, there have been a couple of eye-catching requests that have come in, fortunately when I’ve not been working.


The first was a request to remove a diabetic pen needle from a patients’ ear lobe after they got an itch whilst administering their insulin. The second was a request to adjust/remove some surgical tubing from a patient who had recently had extensive surgery.


We were able to assist with one of the requests and the second patient is fortunate I wasn’t in as, I’ve watched so many US medical dramas that I reckon I could pretty much save anyone armed only with a Swiss Army Knife, a biro and wire coat hanger.


Nat Mitchell


For further information on our services please visit our website or follow us on Facebook or Twitter


WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


If you are eligible for a FREE NHS FLU JAB, then you are welcome to have it with us regardless of which GP surgery you are registered with as long as it is in the UK


The eligible groups for the 2018/19 service are: Those aged 65 years & over


(including those aged 65 years by 31st March 2019)


People aged over 18 years of age with one or more of the following conditions:


Respiratory Disease


(such as severe asthma, COPD or bronchitis) Chronic Heart Disease Kidney Disease Liver Disease


Neurological Disease


(e.g. Parkinson’s disease or motor neurone disease) Diabetes of any type Immunosuppression


(due to disease or treatment such as cancer treatment) Spleen removal or splenic dysfunction Morbid obesity


Pregnant women aged 18 or over Carers and Care Workers


Household contacts of immunocompromised individuals who are aged 18 or over


Please get in touch if you are unsure whether you are eligible


PRIVATE (FOUR STRAIN)VACCINE JUST £10 (over 9 years of age)


TRAVEL CLINIC AVAILABLE FOR VACCINATIONS and ANTIMALARIALS


31 Main Street, Cockermouth CA13 9LE


Monday to Friday: 8.30am - 6.00pm and Saturday: 8.30am - 4.00pm www.allisonschemist.com | 01900 822 292


ISSUE 429 | 20 SEPTEMBER 2018 | 17


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