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76 EXTERNAL ENVELOPE


A new world of exterior timber cladding possibilities is available using Accoya®


Accoya® F


rom exterior cladding for houses to large scale commercial projects, with a 50 year above ground guarantee, wood is the ideal material for timber


cladding where aesthetics, stability, durability and less frequent maintenance are required. Due to Accoya®


wood’s improved


dimensional stability, the use of wider cladding boards is possible, allowing and specifiers greater design flexibility. Wherever wood cladding is needed, Accoya®


is the right


construction material for your application. Take a look below at some stunning examples of Accoya®


wood cladding projects from around the world.


AUSTRALIA Barangaroo House, a free-standing, three- storey restaurant, has become one of the first projects in Sydney to utilise Accoya®


UNIQUE SPLIT LEVEL RESTAURANT CLAD IN CHARRED ACCOYA®


WOOD – wood


cladding and the distinctive Japanese charring technique, Shou Sugi Ban. Situated on the edge of Sydney Harbour, Barangaroo House opened in December 2017 and is the latest venture by one of Australia’s most celebrated chefs, Matt Moran. Inspired by the potential of creating a


building in the round, the unique split level restaurant was designed by architects, Collins and Turner, taking on a remarkable organic form clad in charred Accoya® Dowelled Accoya® Dowelled Accoya®


. 45mm of


and 45mm of Half were laminated into a


series of predetermined radii with a Shou Sugi Ban (medium char) finish applied to create a striking charcoal appearance.


©Rory Gardiner


EXTERIOR WOOD CLADDING USED FOR VILLA BIE – DENMARK This beautiful residential home sees Accoya®


cladding at its best. Utilising some


inspirational exterior cladding ideas, Architects MLRP have designed an extraordinary and eye catching residence. This Accoya®


clad house, is a unique


structure compared to the usual traditional Danish house. The house looks as if it grows out of the earth at an angle. This striking detached private residence has been clad with 650 m2


of Accoya® cladding. Accoya®


Accoya® and the Trimarque Device are registered trademarks owned by Titan Wood Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of Accsys Technologies PLC


wood


marketing@accoya.com www.accoya.com


DILLON KYLE ARCHITECTS OFFICE BUILDING GIVES THE WOW FACTOR WITH ACCOYA®


– USA


When Dillon Kyle Architects set out to design their new office space across the street from the Houston Center for Photography, they needed creative solutions to fit a 5,000 square foot building plus parking on the lot’s small unique space. The exterior has a commercial boxy look,


so the team looked for creative cladding finishes to wrap the building and also serve as a rainscreen. After dismissing glass and papier-mâché options, the team settled on Accoya®


wood wrapping the entire building.


wood


is the only type of exterior wood cladding that can be mounted tightly with tongue and groove vertical or horizontal assembly.


wood. An abstract leaf-like pattern


is carved into 2,500 eight-foot long by eight-inches tall and 11/16-inches in depth, Accoya®


CLADDING ON PIPERS CORNER SCHOOL – UK Accoya®


ACCOYA® CHOSEN FOR THE was selected as the ideal material to


clad the Performing Arts Centre for Pipers Corner School, High Wycombe. Over 1200m2 of Accoya®


cladding, soffits and trims were


used throughout the project for phase 1 of the build. Designed by Nichols Brown Webber Architects and Landscape Planners, Accoya® was chosen due to its Class 1 durability and low maintenance upkeep. It was also specified due to its sustainability credentials.


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF SEPTEMBER 2018


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