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74 EXTERNAL ENVELOPE


EQUITONE specified on University of Hull’s £30m student accommodation


A


set of new, luxurious student accommodation blocks featuring 6,500m2


of EQUITONE [tectiva]


fibre cement facade material have been created with the results offering a striking aesthetic design. The Courtyard provides purpose-built


housing for 600 students at the University of Hull’s Cottingham Road campus. The £30 million facility combines en-suite rooms along with rooftop apartments and separate lounges, games rooms and a cinema. EQUITONE [tectiva], a through-coloured


fibre cement facade material, was specified for its aesthetically pleasing, natural and modern appearance. Chosen in a variety of colours, the lighter shades were specifically used to brighten up the internal courtyard. Steve Elwen, chartered architect at


GSSArchitecture, based in Harrogate, said: “We chose EQUITONE as it’s a robust and durable material that has a life expectancy of at least 50 years and its A2-s1, d0 fire classification makes it a perfect facade choice. “For this project, we were inspired by minimal and subtle Scandinavian design, which is popular for educational projects due to it being modern and on-trend, and EQUITONE [tectiva] created this aesthetic perfectly as it has a range of elegant and natural shades. The material can be cut into different shapes and sizes, which allowed us to break the panels up and create an eye-catching pattern.” The accommodation consists of five


separate blocks around two courtyards. Most of the development is taken up by eight- bedroom clusters with a communal kitchen and dining space. There are also 20 deluxe rooms, 28 self-contained one-bed apartments and six wheelchair accessible flats. Steve added: “The buildings are laid out in


a zig zag pattern, allowing them to make the most of natural sunlight. We used more of EQUITONE [tectiva] in colour Chalk which is lighter in shade than the two other panels, to brighten up the courtyard area, making it a more pleasant area to be in. “We originally wanted to use a secret fix


system to secure EQUITONE onto the build- ing but with strict budgets we decided to opt for a face fixing, which blended in perfectly with the cladding itself, making it a great alternative when budgets are tight.”


EQUITONE [tectiva] is a through- coloured fibre cement facade material that offers elegant shades of natural colour providing a unique aesthetic effect. Characterised by the fine-sanded lines and naturally occurring hues within the material, these enhance the natural matt appearance, which comes to life with the effects of light and shade.


All EQUITONE materials are available in


a range of colours, finishes and fixing options, giving full creative scope. For more information on EQUITONE


facade materials, visit the EQUITONE website.


01283 722588 www.equitone.com


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF SEPTEMBER 2018


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