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PROJECT REPORT: HERITAGE & CONSERVATION


55


Britannia Cast Iron Rainwater System W


illiams & Burrows Heritage Repair Ltd are specialists in the repair and maintenance of historic


buildings. Based in Devon – with over 50 years’ experience, they were the ideal contractor for the refurbishment of St Michaels and All Angels Church, a Grade I listed building in the heart of Exeter. The church required a complete overhaul


and replacement of the rainwater system to the north and south aisles, vestry and sacristy. Williams & Burrows, their architect – Jonathan Rhind Architects and A collaborated to ensure that the correct product, the right quantities, and a high-quality cast iron was all present in the rainwater system, and that it would be in keeping with the traditional style of the Grade I listed church. Prior to the order being placed ARP


provided a pre-painted sample of the cast iron so that both Williams & Burrows and Jonathan Rhind Architects could inspect and approve the quality. Once approved, the order for cast iron


guttering and downpipes was placed and ARP responded with a speedy delivery date. All products and accessories were painted semi-gloss black in our in-house wet paint line and then suitably packed and despatched to site for installation. The sizeable order included Britannia


cast iron moulded ogee gutter and rectangular cast collared downpipes. These products were chosen for this project specifically as it is a high quality and conservation equivalent product ensuring that all heritage considerations were adhered to. The profiles and painted finish are


in keeping with the traditional style of the building and Britannia Cast Iron is expected to last for at least 100 years, providing it is maintained and repainted regularly. The Britannia Cast Iron range from ARP is


the ideal choice for listed, conservation or heritage properties - made from traditional die casts, Britannia can be used to match or replace existing cast iron rainwater systems. The Britannia range of gutters, downpipes and hoppers are available either primed or painted to 8 standard colours. The advantage of having your order pre-painted means there is much less time spent on site, and once installed it is protected from the elements. As a standard service, ARP provides a touch up paint to finish the job. Richard Burrows said “Our client, architect and ourselves were pleased with the products supplied and appreciated the endeavour of ARP to get things right. We will use ARP again and would happily recommend them”.


01162982570 www.arp-ltd.com


Icynene – the spray-foam thermal blanket


A well-insulated building means a healthier, quieter and more energy eff icient environment with better comfort levels and lower heating bills.


And nothing does a better job of insulation than Icynene – the first name in spray foam insulation.


Icynene expands 100-fold when applied, sealing all gaps, service holes and hard to reach spaces, completely eliminating cold bridging and helping reduce energy bills.


What’s more, its open cell structure lets the building breathe naturally.


Icynene. It’s the modern way to insulate buildings, old and new.


For for more information on the benefits of Icynene visit icynene.co.uk


CE Mark Approval


Certifi cate No 08/4598


ISO 9001


Accepted


ADF SEPTEMBER 2018


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


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