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CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY, USA BOHLIN CYWINSKI JACKSON


Architecture firm Bohlin Cywinski Jackson (BCJ) has announced their designs for two new buildings at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). Both projects, ANSYS Hall and TCS Hall, are designed for collaborative research and “maker- based learning”. The buildings will be utilised by faculty, graduate and undergraduate students across multiple disciplines, and “underscore university-corporate partnerships”. ANSYS Hall is designed to be a 36,000 ft2


, four-storey facility


for CMU’s College of Engineering. The 90,000 ft2 TCS Hall building will serve as a “gateway” for students who are entering the CMU campus from Forbes Avenue.


MERCURY TOWER, MALTA ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS


The Zaha Hadid Architects-designed renovation and redevelopment of Mercury House has started on site. Derelict for more than 20 years, the 9,405 m2


site includes the remaining facades of the


former Mercury House that date from 1903. Working with Malta’s leading conservation architect, the heritage structures will be renovated as integral parts of the new development. The 31- storey tower of residential apartments and hotel is aligned at street level to reduce its footprint, maximising civic space within the new piazza. The tower’s realignment “expresses the different functional programmes within” said the architects.


HAMBURG INNOVATION PORT, GERMANY MVRDV


Construction has begun on the first phase of Hamburg Innovation Port, a 60,000 m2 mixed-use


development at the inner harbour of Hamburg-Harburg, the city’s southern high-tech hub. The project designed by MVRDV “connects existing port typologies with an urban dynamic to create architectural diversity and innovation on the existing site,” said the architects. On the 20,000 m2 m2


site, around 60,000


of gross floor space will be built over several phases for more than 2,500 jobs and the planned expansion of Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH). In addition, the innovation park is intended to facilitate the networking of business and science and offer the “best prerequisites for establishing a vibrant start-up scene,” added the firm. Jacob van Rijs, co-founder, MVRDV commented: “Part of the plan is the idea of a diverse public space in which each section has its own strong character.” He added: “There is a park, a boulevard, a square, shared spaces and a waterside promenade that invites office workers to have outside meetings and al fresco luncheons creating a vibrant waterside neighbourhood.”


ADF SEPTEMBER 2018


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


© Render by VA


© Bohlin Cywinski Jackson


© MVRDV


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