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24 INSIGHTS


© Nicolas Tye Architects, Gresfold Architects & Quintin Lake


At least 75 per cent of the heat from exhaust air should be transferred to the fresh air by means of a heat exchanger situated within the roof of the building


The PHI also states that the highest U-value for complete window installations remains at 0.85 W/m2


K. For the design


of roofs in particular, this requires the specification of rooflights that are either triple or quadruple glazed to ensure they do not exceed the maximum U-value. To achieve this, we work with manufacturers such as Roof Maker, which offers a Passivhaus accredited fixed flat rooflight with a quadruple glazing option and a U-value of 0.2 W/m2


K. Specifying products


such as this ensures we can be confident we are well within the PHI’s requirements to achieve complete energy and solar gain efficiencies. Typically, the installation of windows, doors and rooflights is where the greatest level of energy is expected to be lost, due to the glazing present and the breaks between the frame and the glass offering the opportunity for heat to escape. Therefore, the frames must be well insulated and fitted with low-e glazing filled with argon or krypton to prevent heat transfer. For most cool-temperate climates, this requires a U-value of 0.80 W/m2 or less, with g-values around 50 per cent.


K Nicolas Tye is the director of Nicolas Tye Architects WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


In residential builds, the roof space of a property is now often used as an additional living space, usually an extra bedroom. To ensure it conforms to all Passivhaus requirements, thermal comfort of the space must be met during both winter and summer, with not more than 10 per cent of the hours in a given year over 25°C. The premise of thermal comfort is that it can be achieved solely by ‘post-heating’ or ‘post-cooling’ the fresh air mass through efficient indoor air quality conditions. This removes the requirement for additional recirculation of air through manual ventilation systems such as opening rooflights and windows. To ensure this, it requires adequate insulation of the building’s envelope to ensure the desired level of warmth can be achieved within the property.


In order to successfully obtain the Passivhaus standard, the roof space must also feature an adequate ventilation strategy, allowing for good indoor air quality and energy savings. At least 75 per cent of the heat from the exhaust air should be transferred to the fresh air again by means of a heat exchanger. This should be situated within the roof of the building to ensure the successful exchange between the exhaust air within the building and the fresh air outside of the building. The PHI states Passivhaus is a “building standard that is truly energy efficient, comfortable, affordable and ecological at the same time.” This provides architects with the ideal opportunity to continue to revolutionise the expectations and realisations of both residential and commercial constructions to pave the way for a more energy efficient future.


ADF SEPTEMBER 2018


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