search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
14 NEWS EDUCATION


Planning approval granted for Stirling University Sports Centre


Stirling Council has approved plans drawn up by FaulknerBrowns Architects, for a £20m transformation of the University of Stirling’s sports facilities.


The redevelopment of the University’s sports centre will create an “iconic” new sports building that integrates with existing facilities on the site, including the national tennis and swimming academies. The new building will provide an


“animated entrance gateway to the sports centre,” said the architects, and includes purpose-built studios, an fitness suite, three- court sports hall, indoor cycling studio, strength and conditioning area, as well as a new state-of-the-art high performance suite. Users of the new building will also benefit from enhanced changing facilities and communal spaces. The site is located around Airthrey Loch, with views to local hill ranges and


DUBLIN


Steven Holl team wins Dublin college project


A team led by New York and Beijing- based studio Steven Holl Architects (SHA) has won an international design competition to design the Future Campus project for University College Dublin. SHA’s Precinct Masterplan covers a circa 24 ha including a “placemaking strategy” that “focuses on creating an exhilarating Centre for Creative Design as a gateway presence which cues to seven new quadrangles of open green space,” and is designed to enhance the campus’ historic features and woodlands. A new pedestrian spine, parallel to the campus’ original spine, creates an “H-plan organisation, lined with weather canopies that double as solar connectors, forming


monuments. A “considered approach to the design process has ensured the redevelopment improves the character and appearance of the sports campus in a way that is sensitive to the quality of its setting,” commented FaulknerBrowns.


The main building responds to the site at three levels – the lower storey “creating a robust base with linkages to the existing swimming academy and sports hall, and the two upper levels establishing a relationship with the street and surroundings.” The double height volume housing the cafe and social spaces “affords the building a civic quality which supports its ambition for transparency and inclusivity”. The building’s glazed frontage exposes a central cylindrical drum that acts as a welcoming focal point. Vertical timber fins – spaced to create a concertina effect – present the illusion of motion. The fitness suite contained within the drum, animates


the infrastructure of an energy network”. Cafes and social spaces are located along paths, landscape spaces are animated by water-retention ponds, rain and wind- protected seating areas and preserved specimen trees. The centre, set by a plaza and a


reflecting pool, displays prismatic forms inspired by the geology of the UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Giant’s Causeway. It features “abundant use of natural light, which is captured by two vertical structures angled at 23 degrees, mirroring the earth’s tilt,” said the architects. “The auditorium echoes the shape of the college’s iconic dodecahedral 1972 water tower, and the centre’s towers respond to the water tower’s pentagonal pillar.” The centre is intended to encourage


creative collaboration and interaction with a ‘circuit of social connection’ that allows students, faculty and visitors to “peer into maker and classroom spaces through glass walls but also respects deep creativity by providing spaces for


views from the main approach routes. Sherief El-Salamani, project leader at FaulknerBrowns, said: “This scheme will enhance the student experience by providing new and more visually accessible sporting facilities as well as a new gateway building which will open up the performance, wellbeing and social aspects of the centre to the wider student body and local community.”


concentration and silence.” Holl’s studio was supported by Dublin- based Kavanagh Tuite Architects, US analysts Brightspot Strategy, structural engineers Arup, landscape architects and urban designers HarrisonStevens and climate engineers Transsolar. The international jury included architects Sir David Adjaye and Ann Beha, urban planner Joe Berridge, Sean Mulryan, chairman and CEO, Ballymore, and Dr Paul Thompson, vice-chancellor, Royal College of Art, London, amongst other luminaries.


© Steven Holl Architects


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF SEPTEMBER 2018


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116