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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 31 YEARS


EAT FOR A BETTER LIFE! 7.30pm Wednesdays 12th September - 17th October


Lorton Street Methodist Church In the Garden Room


Come and learn to eat well Give up dieting for ever Enjoy more Energy and Better Health


Book now 07782 477 364 jackie@learntoeatwell.co.uk


COCKERMOUTH COUNTRY MARKET NEWS


During the school summer holidays, we’ve been offering a Kids’ Craft Table for primary-age children to do half-hour craft sessions at the Country Market. A parent or guardian needs to stay in the building throughout the session, but a good time can be had by all, as there’s a chance for browsing our food and craft tables or having a more peaceful cuppa in our ‘Coffee Shop’ while children are occupied on the opposite side of the room! Look out for the


notice on our ‘A-board’ on the pavement in front of the URC, or check Cockermouth Country Market’s Facebook page to find out if it’s happening on the Friday you’ll be visiting the Market. Places are limited to 5 children per session and cost is £1.00 per child. Sessions are at 10.00am and 10.30am.


BUY LOCAL, YOU KNOW IT MAKES SENSE! We’re open from 9.00am-12.30pm every Friday


EMBLETON COMMUNITY HALL


Looking for a Hall for a Wedding, Birthday or Seminar?


• Fully equipped kitchen able to cater for 100 people


• Disabled access and facilities • Sound & Loop systems • £9.00 per hour


Enquiries & Bookings Contact Chris 01768776697


www.embletonparish.com Embleton & District Community Hall Trust are Big lottery funded


Now open Saturday nights too!


Pizza and beer!


40 Challoner Street Cockermouth CA13 9QU


01900 824474


www.facebook.com/thecoffeekitchen www.twitter.com/thecoffkitch


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


13-15 Market Place Cockermouth CA13 9NH


01900 821599 Join us on Facebook and Twitter


www.facebook.com/thecoffeekitchenbakery www.twitter.com/theckbakery


ISSUE 428 | 23 AUGUST 2018 | 44 TOO MUCH SUN!


Remember the sunshine? Remember the heat? Remember throwing the duvet to one side in the night? Remember having to drink what seemed like gallons of water? Remember watching your lawn going from green to brown? I know it was only a few weeks ago but it seems like a different world. They’ve even cancelled the hosepipe ban now. The ‘British Summer’ is returning to normal.


The hot weather had an enormous effect on the growing of our fruit and vegetables this year. Our wine producers are looking forward to a bumper crop. Our salad producers are seeing their profits wither away under the sun. Some farmers are harvesting only one fifth of the product they would do in a normal year. That is a huge reduction in the fruit and vegetables that we hope, as a nation, to produce each year.


This can only mean one thing – price increases. We’ve already seen prices increase on imported


goods from our European neighbours after the referendum. We’re also never too far away from a natural disaster damaging supply around the world. We use vanilla extract and you will not believe the price of it in the current climate. It actually cost more per kilo than silver, stick that in your Mr. Whippy!


In the short-term, we’re going to see price rises across the board. Medium-term it might stabilise. Long-term? Depends on Brexit. It’s not looking good. We might have to pay substantially more for our food than we have in the recent past. This could be a real problem in the future.


We have enjoyed a period of time when food has been cheap and plentiful. I haven’t got a crystal ball. I don’t know what’s going to happen. It might be OK. Then again, we might all need to grow potatoes in our back gardens.


Andy and Angela, The Coffee Kitchen


nutrition with jackie ~ REAL FOOD IS BETTER VALUE ~


Is money tight after the holidays? Around 40 years ago, we spent a 1/4 of our income (25%) on food, now it’s only about 10%. Price is key when choosing what to buy.


A common reason people give me for not eating real food it that it’s too expensive compared to ready meals and takeaways. Nothing could be further from the truth, it’s just that the manufacturers are adept at presenting their wares as cheap.


Ready meals are £2.50 a pop (should that be a ping?); basic takeaways anything from £3.00 or £4.00 upwards. Other people might sacrifice their money and food quality to avoid a few minutes of cooking, but you want good food, good value and good health, so I’ve had a go at costing some recipes (see my website). They’re all under £2.00 per person, from decadent pork stroganoff at £1.87, through pasta with salmon sauce and salad at £1.60, to liver and onions with cabbage and mash at 81p for the most nutritious food on the planet (liver is high in vitamin K, so not good with warfarin).


Pasta and salmon sauce – serves 2 Cook pasta in boiling water (25p) In a small saucepan melt some butter (10p) Add a 212g tin of pink salmon (£1.84) 1/3 tin tomatoes - freeze the rest (12p) Big pinch of fresh dill - freeze the rest (6p)


At the end stir in 50ml double cream - don’t let it boil (25p)


Drain the pasta, stir through some butter (6p) then pour the sauce over.


Serve with a mixed salad - lettuce, carrot, tomato, radish (52p)


Dressed with olive oil and vinegar Total £3.20; £1.60 per person. So easy, so quick, so tasty!


Top tips – Real food saves you a packet!


Jackie Wilkinson - Nutrition Coaching


jackie@learntoeatwell.co.uk www.learntoeatwell.co.uk 077824 77364


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