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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 31 YEARS TEA FOR FREE


AND A PASSIONATE ENCOUNTER


WORDSWORTH HOUSE AND GARDEN


 Kathleen Jones will be talking about the ‘Passionate Sisterhood’


As summer gives way to autumn, it is the perfect time to enjoy a tour or talk – and a free cuppa at Wordsworth House and Garden.


Take a half-hour taster tour around William’s childhood home and discover how the happiness and heartache of his years in Cockermouth helped turn him into one of the world’s best-loved poets. House tours are at 11.30am and 2.30pm on Mondays and Thursdays from 3rd September to 18th October.


Drop in at 11.30am any Tuesday in September to meet head gardener Amanda Thackeray for a stroll amid the golden hues and laden fruit trees of the riverside garden and find out what it takes to care for William’s childhood playground.


Or, on Saturday 15th September, celebrate Heritage Open Day by exploring the house and garden free of charge and, at 11.30am or 2.30pm, listening to a talk by the maid-of-all-work on the secret life of William’s sister Dorothy.


To get to know this remarkable family even better, take a seat in the atmospheric dining room on Thursday 20th September at 7.30pm for a special talk by historian Kathleen Jones, author of A Passionate Sisterhood, the story of the women behind the Romantic poets.


Tickets, which cost £10.00 including a glass of wine, are available from Wordsworth House shop, or by emailing wordsworthhouse@nationaltrust.org.uk. All other talks and tours are free with admission to the house and garden.


Whatever day you come, don’t miss the moving ‘Where Poppies Blow’ exhibition marking 100 years since the end of the First World War. New exhibits include the war diary of poet Edward Thomas, whose pages carry the shocking imprint of the moment he died.


Round off your visit by relaxing in the cosy café. Present an original copy of the Wordsworth House advert in this issue before 28th October, to enjoy a free cup of tea or coffee with your food order.


Or, as there’s no charge to enter the café, why not pop in when you’re passing and treat yourself to a cream tea or a warming jug of hot chocolate?


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK 


         


 


 





A PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF COCKERMOUTH ~ COCKERMOUTH PROBUS CLUB ~


Eric Cass recently delivered a very interesting talk entitled ‘A Photographic History of Cockermouth’. He began with a picture of a 1775 map of the town, followed by other maps, which clearly showed its development, linked to a series of mainly monochrome photographs. This was a fascinating journey through time, which for many members was quite nostalgic.


Eric presented a selection of images, such as the towering Tweed Mill on Tweedmill Lane, the now demolished historic Old Hall and the oddly placed Neddy’s Clock on Main Street. It was a memorial clock named after Edward Waugh the last M.P. for Cockermouth. The talk was interspersed with humorous anecdotes and cryptic questions, such as, why was this clock not positioned in the middle of the street?


As Eric proceeded, he showed how the arrival of the railway, in the form of the goods yard, where the Lakes Home


Centre now resides, led to the rapid development of this once small market town. He explained how much of the greenfield land of the Leconfield Estate became available for development in order to pay off death duties following the demise of Lord Leconfield. A number of members reminisced about their youth on seeing pictures of shops and public houses, which no longer exist. Images of large crowds in Main Street and Market Place for the Hiring Fairs for farmhands and domestic servants, also aroused quite a lot of interest, as did Cousin Charley’s Day the forerunner of today’s carnival.


Richard Bennett gave a hearty vote of thanks for a fascinating history of our town.


Anyone interested in joining Cockermouth Probus, email cockermouthprobusclub@gmail.com


Mike Rooney ISSUE 428 | 23 AUGUST 2018 | 36


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