search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:AUGUST/SEPTEMBER Tenancy Deposit Schemes


Rob Winder explains Tenancy Deposit Schemes and how they are used to protect tenants’ deposits.


Tenancy Deposit Schemes were introduced by the Government to offer protection for deposits paid by a residential tenant to a landlord.


There are two types of Tenancy Deposit Schemes; a Custodial Tenancy Deposit Scheme, and an Insurance Tenancy Deposit Scheme. It is up to the landlord to decide which best suits them.


When must a deposit be protected?


Any deposit provided by the tenant in relation to an Assured Shorthold Tenancy which started after 6 April 2007 must be protected by a Tenancy Deposit Scheme.


The landlord must ensure that the deposit is protected in a government-approved scheme within 30 days of receiving it from the tenant. The landlord must then also confirm to the tenant where the deposit is protected, the amount of the deposit which has been received and protected, and how and when the deposit will be returned to the tenant.


The landlord must also protect a deposit that has been provided by a third party on a tenant’s behalf (e.g. a parent).


What if the landlord does not protect the deposit?


If the landlord has not protected the deposit, the tenant is able to take the landlord to Court. The Court can order the landlord to pay the deposit into a Tenancy Deposit Scheme, and to pay the tenant between one and three times the amount of the deposit as compensation.


In addition, if the landlord has failed to protect the deposit, or has failed to disclose the information of where the deposit is being protected, it may be more difficult to evict the tenant.


Landlord / Tenant Disputes


In the event of a dispute, a Tenancy Deposit Scheme encourages the tenant and the landlord to settle the dispute via Alternative Dispute Resolution. If successful, this means that neither party has to issue court proceedings, saving both parties money and time. It should be noted, that once the tenant and landlord have agreed to use Alternative Dispute Resolution, then the decision will be binding.


Prior to Tenancy Deposit Schemes, some landlords unlawfully withheld the deposit from the Tenant at the end of the tenancy. To reclaim the deposit, the tenant would have to consider taking legal action against the landlord which could be time consuming and costly. A Tenancy Deposit Scheme ensures that the decision as to whether the deposit is returned to the tenant, or whether the landlord keeps a certain amount of the deposit, is decided fairly.


For more information on landlord and tenant issues, contact Rob Winder on 01900 510366 or e: rw@burnetts.co.uk or visit www.burnetts.co.uk


Expert legal advice on your doorstep


        


  


       


01900 510 366 3c Lakeland Business Park, Lamplugh Road, Cockermouth. CA13 0QT e: ts@burnetts.co.uk www.burnetts.co.uk/WestCumbria WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


ISSUE 428 | 23 AUGUST 2018 | 21


Cockermouth


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60