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ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:JULY/AUGUST


Cafe open to the public


We have a lot of cute and cuddly animals at the Wildlife Park, but we also have quite a few scaly and spiny animals!


There are over a 100 species in total at the Park and this includes snakes, lizards, tortoises and insects. As part of our ongoing educational and conservation programme, our Keepers enjoy sharing their knowledge about how diverse and amazing animals are all over the world and how important it is to protect them and the habitats they live in.


If you want to learn more about reptiles and get up close and personal, come along and take part in one of our reptile encounters which we hold at the Park every day.


Name: Kasper Hansen Position: Reptile keeper


I guess I am the one with the ‘weird’ job in the Park, as the reptile keeper I take care of all things scaly, creepy and ‘scary’ but to me they are not! I love reptiles and amphibians and insects, so much so, that I travel the jungles of Guatemala on a semi-regular basis to help research some of these wonderful creatures. I have not long come back from one of those trips, probably my best one to date.


On this expedition we were among other things, looking at snake behaviour, this was usually done at night under red light so as


WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK Kasper with Andy the Bredl's Python


not to disturb the snakes. When we found an arboreal snake, we would immediately switch from white to red, one person would keep an eye on the snake while the others would take some environmental data and then we all stood as still as we could to observe the snake.


It was during one of these observations that I thought to myself: “You know what, I have never actually watched a snake just being a snake like this before!” I found a lot of my


KEEPER NOTES FROM THE WILDLIFE PARK


KASPER - THE ONE WITH THE WEIRD JOB!


assumptions of snake behaviour were (at least in these individuals) completely wrong, I was struck with a renewed fascination for these animals.


This was just one of many discoveries we made on this trip, some of scientific importance, others of personal marvel. Coming back home, I again realise how lucky I am to be able to work with these creatures on a daily basis and when my usually busy days permit it, you can find me in the reptile corridor observing our snakes.


Spike the Bearded Dragon


Richard Robinson, Park Manager and the Team Find out more at www.lakedistrictwildlifepark.com


017687 76239 53ISSUE 427 | 19 JULY 2018 | 53


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