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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 31 YEARS


SECRET GARDEN


Cleansing wipes are not only destroying our planet but also our skin


We’ve all grabbed the cleansing wipes when we’ve had a late night or been super busy at work because we think it’s better than going to bed with our make-up on. They seem like a godsend because they’re convenient, cheap, simple to use and mean no messing around with cotton wool pads or creams... just wipe and go.


So why are they bad for our planet? Disposal is the issue. According to the Marine Conservation Society, they're the fastest-growing cause of pollution on our beaches. The number of wipes picked up by its volunteers (myself included) has risen by 50% in the last three years.


We offer a wonderful collection of quality decorative lighting from classical elegance to modern contemporary, all at affordable prices.


They build up on the beach because they're not biodegradable and don't dissolve or rot down. Flushed down the toilet, they end up clogging up filters at the sewage treatment plants and if we throw them in the bin, they go to landfill and the alcohol, preservative, fragrances, cleansing and moisturising agents cause problems there instead.


You can’t even put them in compost heaps for the same reason.


All in all, they are not good news for the environment. There are biodegradable options available, but these tend to be more expensive and aren’t great for your skin.


How do they harm skin? As a beauty therapist, I gasp in horror when someone says they use wipes. The chemicals they are saturated with are the biggest cause of skin irritation and redness I see. What makes matters worse, is they're not even effective at removing make-up, instead they tend to take the surface product off your skin, then smear the residue around your face, rather than removing it, which causes more irritation.


They’re harsh on your skin, you’ll have noticed that using a wipe can take a little bit of scrubbing to remove your make- up, especially eyeliner and mascara. All that rubbing will drag your skin causing, irritation, redness, lines and wrinkles. Remember, the golden rule in skin care is treat your skin like the most delicate silk, never pull or rub, be as gentle as possible.


Ditch the wipes! They're bad for the environment and bad for your skin. Instead, go for a good cleansing routine because it's the key to healthy glowing skin. It only takes an extra couple of minutes, but your skin will reward you for it, by looking younger for years longer!


However, if you need a quick, fast option there is a solution. The Magic Mitt from Jane Iredale is a reusable micro-fibre cleansing cloth that you use with water, which removes your make-up and even mascara.


If you struggle to get hold of them, just give me a call as I stock them in the salon.


Tina at The Secret Garden Spa


Tel: 016973 52500 • www.secretgardenspa.co.uk Blaithwaite, Bolton Low Houses, Wigton CA78PW


Limelighting


Station Road, Cockermouth Call: 01900 822480


f or visit: www.limelighting.co.uk INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK ISSUE 427 | 19 JULY 2018 | 42


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