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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 31 YEARS COCKERMOUTH


COUNTRY MARKET NEWS Friday mornings are homegrown and homemade!


Join us on a Friday morning, for the chance to buy delicious homemade foods including sweet and savoury items, wonderful homegrown garden produce, free range eggs from local hens and ducks, local honey from Gilcrux and a wide variety of locally-created handmade craft items,


including knitting, art,


costume jewellery, notebooks, wood- turning, up-cycled glass items and much more!


You can chat to local producers about their creations and have a cuppa with friends and family from our Coffee Shop.


We’re open every week of the year in the United Reformed Church on Main Street and will be happy to see you when you visit us.


BUY LOCAL, YOU KNOW IT MAKES SENSE! We’re open from 9.00am-12.30pm every Friday


EMBLETON COMMUNITY HALL


Looking for a Hall for a Wedding, Birthday or Seminar?


• Fully equipped kitchen able to cater for 100 people


• Disabled access and facilities • Sound & Loop systems • £9.00 per hour


Enquiries & Bookings Contact Chris 01768776697


www.embletonparish.com Embleton & District Community Hall Trust are Big lottery funded


Value for money in the Post


Advertise in this space for only £38.00!


Call Helen or Mike on 01900 824655 or email: info@thecockermouthpost.co.uk


Two places, two great welcomes!


THE SOUND OF SILENCE!


If you can, sit very quietly and listen. Go on. Try it. What do you hear? What noises can you discern? Birdsong? A car driving past? A radio in a neighbouring garden, how annoying is that? Maybe an RAF training sortie overhead?


One thing you won’t hear is the sound of roadworks. At long last. At long, long, long last, the town is roadwork free. No big drills. No big hammers. Nothing. The repairs to Market Place are the last planned disruptions. Hallelujah.


40 Challoner Street Cockermouth CA13 9QU


01900 824474


www.facebook.com/thecoffeekitchen www.twitter.com/thecoffkitch


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


13-15 Market Place Cockermouth CA13 9NH


01900 821599 Join us on Facebook and Twitter


www.facebook.com/thecoffeekitchenbakery www.twitter.com/theckbakery


ISSUE 427 | 19 JULY 2018 | 38


Without question, the town has suffered. It’s been like a roadwork/flood sandwich for the last nine years. It has affected trade both during the day and in the evenings. When we first moved to Cockermouth, nearly twenty years ago, Friday nights used to be really busy. So much so, that there were always three or four police cars and vans parked in town just in case! That no longer happens.


No more. It’s all done and dusted. We can


breathe a sigh of relief and move forward. The future is bright.


There is so much to entice visitors. The two rivers, often a cause of the misery, bring life and vitality right into the centre of town. Walks along the riverbanks can reveal so much – unexpected views and unexpected wildlife encounters. On a sunny day, there is no better shopping experience than broad Main Street, bustling Station Street and historic Market Place. Not many towns our size can boast the range of shops we do – most locally and independently owned. Add into that Wordsworth House and Jennings Brewery and we have a lot for folks to see.


It won’t be easy. It will be hard. Like every small market town there will be challenges ahead. Yet with the goodwill of everyone, Cockermouth can return to former glories – a gem among towns.


Andy and Angela, The Coffee Kitchen


nutrition with jackie ~ PICNICS!~


One of the joys of summer is eating al fresco and a picnic is an essential part of a family outing.


Have you noticed that food tastes better when we eat it outside? Psychologists have found that our physical sensations and emotional responses are greatly improved by the power of our perception of our environment. Restaurants have applied this science to their décor, choosing colour, patterns and music to set the mood. The same food actually tastes different depending on the wallpaper!


We also connect enjoyment of food with family memories: a favourite outdoor spot, the smell of grass and wild flowers, the sound of trees rustling in the breeze, the feel of warm sand on bare feet. When our brains are stimulated, our taste buds step up a notch.


And the food - what do you take? On television, you’ll see images of unhealthy fizzy drinks, crisps, cheese, processed almost to the point of being plastic and all manner of factory-made nibbles. You’re getting back to the great outdoors, nature and all things real, so I’m sure you want better than fake food.


Fruit is nice and juicy, although it can attract


wasps and invite the biting midge to suck your sweet blood. Use it to make a refreshing drink by adding a few slices of apple, lemon and strawberry to a big bottle of water. Chill it well before you set off.


Sandwiches are common but often dry, dull and too heavy on bread to be a good choice for lunch. Instead try boiled eggs, cheese, salami, lettuce, tomatoes, sticks of crunchy carrot and celery, cooling cucumber, spring onions, ham rolled around cream cheese and small bread rolls with butter. My grandmother’s special was fried chicken in breadcrumbs – so tasty!


Top tips – enjoy a real food picnic!


Jackie Wilkinson - Nutrition Coaching jackie@learntoeatwell.co.uk www.learntoeatwell.co.uk 077824 77364


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