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ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:JULY/AUGUST


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COCKERMOUTH HERITAGE GROUP NEWS


Members of the Heritage Group are putting together


the display for the summer exhibition at the Kirkgate Centre starting at the end of the month.


A couple of people have been researching men whose names appear on the War Memorial and who died in 1918 and 1919. They have been able to build profiles for most of the men, including where they lived and worked but one of the names is proving very difficult. He appears on the War Memorial as E. BARTON with no other details. Can anyone out there help with information about this person? Please get in touch if you can.


Many men were wounded or taken prisoner. They do not appear on the War Memorial because they eventually came home but their suffering should not be forgotten either. Some of those men lived for many years with the consequences of their wartime experiences.


Pte. Walter Forsyth of the Machine Gun Corps, whose home was in Derwent Street, sent word that he was in a German prisoner-of-war camp in August 1918.


Sgt. Smith of the Royal Sussex Regiment, formerly of St. Helen’s Street, was lying wounded in a hospital in France, also in August 1918.


WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


the Military Medal for conspicuous gallantry; he was wounded and made a good recovery at the Cockermouth Auxiliary Hospital (Cockermouth Castle).


Pte. G. Boyd, with parents in Market Place, was wounded in the thigh (his second wound of the War) and taken to a French hospital.


Brigham Schoolmaster wounded: Pte. Ben Weatherston, Headmaster of Brigham School, wounded in the head and neck in the fighting in France.


Convalescents at Cockermouth Castle


In September 1918, Sgt. John Huddart, of Main Street, was wounded in the left shoulder and taken to a hospital in Sheffield.


Pte. Ted Long, youngest son of Mr. W. Long, Cockermouth Postmaster, was severely wounded by a bullet to the shoulder and taken to a hospital in Huddersfield to recuperate.


Pte. G. Foster, son of Mr. and Mrs. Foster of St. Helen’s Street, was admitted to a French hospital after having been gassed: “Gassed eyes painful. I can’t see so padre is writing for me. I am between white sheets and feel quite comfortable…”


Sgt. H. Nettleton of Cockermouth was awarded ISSUE 427 | 19 JULY 2018 | 3


Many men came to the Cockermouth Auxiliary Hospital at Cockermouth Castle, where they were able to recuperate. One of those men was George Onions, not a local man but someone who received the Victoria Cross for his actions in France in August 1918. You can find out more about George and his bravery and much more, at our summer exhibition starting on 30th July – we hope to see you there!


Gloria Edwards


As always, please get in touch: Telephone: 01900 823966 cockermouthheritagegroup@outlook.com www.cockermouthheritagegroup.org.uk


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