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SARAH JANE BROWN


Your work hangs in the Discerner Gallery in Mayfair as well… I mean they’re a choosy lot down there aren’t they? [laughing]


Yes! It’s also in the Russell Gallery in Putney. It’s been a long process, you have to maintain your efforts. You wear so many hats as an artist, from painter to marketeer and packaging expert, it is more than the painting. And you always have to be in the mood for painting as it’s your lively hood? I think that’s what I struggle with the most, balancing the creative part of it, so immersing myself in the creative and getting in the zone, then as soon as you are in the zone and you’re interrupted it knocks you out of kilter. We’ve just been talking about that with other artists. The business head versus the creative head and reconciling the two things. You must carve out blocks of times just for creative.


How do you capture your inspiration?


I take pictures, but my creative process, if you like, starts with walking. I walk each day along the coastal path and I carry a sketch book and if something grabs me I’ll make a quick sketch, whether it’s a shape, a line of contrast, sometimes I go out


purposefully to sketch and I make colour studies – it’s a way to stop and take note rather than refer back. In the studio I create mood boards like a designer and I put them all together from sketches to colour studies and texture studies. I put them together and sometimes bits of poetry or notes I have written that are relevant to that mood. I organise it into themes and then put it away and paint. If I have it in front of me it becomes a copying process which interrupts your flow, you end up copying rather than painting intuitively. So, you internalise it and put it away? Yes, and if I need to refer back to it I can.


What do you do with all that ‘background work’? I store it, I can refer back to it for other work.


Do you do commissions?


Yes, but I try to avoid it unless they understand that it’s about the feeling rather than about a place. So, I try to get the feeling of who they are, what it’s about and what feeling they want to evoke.


www.sjbart.com / 91


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