search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
L I V E 2 4 -SE V EN


THROUGH THE GA RDEN GAT E THE GREENWAY


Our media horticulturalist, Camilla Bassett-Smith, takes a break from the BBC coverage of the RHS flower shows and heads to a green space near home…


On the outskirts of Cheltenham at the foot of Leckhampton Hill, standing proudly in its manorial Hunter boots and Barbour jacket, lies The Greenway, a symbol of class, elegance and good old- fashioned Britishness.


Constructed between 1584 and 1616, this property was originally the home of William Lawrence. His nephew, also William, adored the property and when he inherited it he set about creating gardens that he hoped would “…stand in view of the whole vale and be seen from a distance of many miles”. Indeed he was blessed with a surrounding landscape that Capability Brown would be championing a century later.


Cypress edged the garden with courtyards flanked by pillars and a statue of time was placed centre stage. Today, the Great Oak that stands in the meadow is one of the only remaining sights from


the original horticultural creation and what a sight this is; a perfect specimen, carpeted by green for as far as the eye can see with the undulating backdrop of the glorious hills beyond. This is Britain at its best! In fact the oak was chosen to represent the letter O in a new set of 10p coins released this year to represent Britain in every letter of the alphabet – start checking your change now, the excitement these coins bring is beyond belief!! Anyway, back from currency to botany and another part of the 17th century design still standing – the sunken garden with its glorious square pool, now a lily pond full of perfect pads and their floral explosions. Who would have thought The Greenway could rival Giverny? Monet would have been sure to revel in this picture perfect presentation.


Fruit trees were part of William Lawrence’s plans and today new trees are encased within the boundaries of the remaining ancient walls. Apples, plums and pears promise a fruitful harvest and embryonic figs look like summer baubles, decorative and smooth. The chef, I’m told, had already pickled many of these for use in the hotel restaurant, a policy which is popular here, with baby salad leaves grown specially and herbs plucked regularly from the attractive herb garden, currently ablaze with blossoming sage and fountains of fennel. Forget food miles, this is food feet! Elsewhere in the grounds, an impressive mulberry and walnut also add to the edibles on offer (providing the Shurdington squirrels are not hosting a picnic nut feast anytime soon!). I didn’t partake of a pickled fig or house salad, but have to say their violet eclairs during afternoon tea were pastry perfection!


/ 58


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100