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HEALTHY LIVING HEALTHY PLANET


NA TRIANGLE EDITION PUBLISHER Dee Whitaker


EXECUTIVE EDITOR J. Michael LeGrand ASSOCIATE EDITOR Luke C. LeGrand


DESIGN & PRODUCTION Hart Palmer Design STAFF WRITER Judy Liu WEBSITE NATriangle.com


CONTACT US


Natural Awakenings Triangle 11312 US 15-501 North, Suite 107-144 Chapel Hill, NC 27517


Phone: 919-342-2831 Fax: 919-342-2854


To receive our digital magazine send your email address to: trianglepublisher@triad.rr.com


TriangleCalendar@NaturalAwakeningsMag.com www.NaturalAwakeningsTriangle.com www.facebook.com/TriangleNA


Subscriptions are available by sending $ (for 12 issues) to the above address.


SUBSCRIPTIONS 30


NATIONAL TEAM CEO/FOUNDER Sharon Bruckman PRESIDENT Patrick McGroder


NATIONAL EDITOR Alison Chabonais MANAGING EDITOR Linda Sechrist


NATIONAL ART DIRECTOR Stephen Blancett SR. ART/MKTG. DIRECTOR Steve Hagewood FINANCIAL MANAGER Mary Bruhn


FRANCHISE DIRECTOR Anna Romano FRANCHISE SUPPORT MGR. Heather Gibbs WEBSITE COORDINATOR Rachael Oppy NATIONAL ADVERTISING Kara Scofield


Natural Awakenings Publishing Corporation 4933 Tamiami Trail N., Ste. 203 Naples, FL 34103


Ph: 239-434-9392 • Fax: 239-434-9513 NaturalAwakeningsMag.com


© 2018 by Natural Awakenings. All rights reserved. Although some parts of this publication may be reproduced and reprinted, we require that prior permission be obtained in writing.


Natural Awakenings is a free publication distributed locally and is supported by our advertisers. Please call to find a location near you or if you would like copies placed at your business.


We do not necessarily endorse the views expressed in the articles and advertisements, nor are we responsible for the products and services advertised. Check with a healthcare professional regarding the appropriate use of any treatment.


Never Glossy. Always Green.


Natural Awakenings practices environmental sustainability by using recycled newsprint on uncoated stock. This choice avoids the toxic chemicals and high energy costs of producing shiny coated paper that is hard to recycle. For more information visit my-NA.co.


Dee Whitaker, Publisher July 2018 7


From the Publisher W


e folks in the South love our food. Hopefully most of us now eat a dif- ferent diet than the one we grew up on. I was born in Savannah, Geor- gia—the traditional fare for family was anything fried, sweet tea and a


scrumptious dessert. I still have fond memories of those times around the dinner table. Fortunately, I’ve come a long way from that southern gal hooked on fried foods and lots of sugar. Going gluten-free, dairy-free and mostly sugar-free since I brought Natural Awakenings to the Triangle almost 13 years ago has really made a diff erence. T ank you Natural Awakenings and my husband Michael (also the editor) for setting me straight! My palate has certainly changed. I now make much smarter choices in what I eat based on knowing where my


food comes from and reading labels. Filling my plate mostly with fresh vegetables, and fruits is a long way from the southern-style foods I used to eat. Eating naturally grown, fresh, local food is good for our health, the environment and the local econ- omy. We rejoice that the local natural foods movement is alive and thriving in the Triangle and how the health of our families and communities directly benefi t from it. Each decision we make to grow our own food or buy local fare is being multiplied by hundreds of thousands of like-minded people. T is month’s feature article on page 27 profi les Organic Farmers: Growing Ameri-


ca’s Health that the author, Melinda Hemmelgarn, knows well. T ese organic farmers are among the steadfast heroes making a diff erence in America’s food supply and helping us all become more aware of the healthier food choices we have. T ey are indeed changing American’s landscape and the way we think about the ability of good food to feed us well in the future. Local farmers’ markets are a superb place to start feeding your family right. I recently visited several Triangle farmers markets and learned so much about


locally grown food and the life cycle of organic crops. As stated in our feature article “an organic farmer is a life-long student of nature, seeking to emulate their wisdom and processes as they refi ne their productions systems. Organic production isn’t just growing food without toxic chemical inputs, it is a system that requires conscien- tiously improving and conserving soil, water and associated resources while produc- ing safe and healthy food for American’s growing population of informed consum- ers.” T is information gives us a lot to think about as we choose and partake of the scrumptious bounty we fi nd at our local farmers markets and grocery stores. As awareness continues to expand and even mainstream consumers begin to


seriously change their buying and eating habits, we can leverage higher quality for America’s food supply. One supportive initiative is the grassroots lobby for honesty and integrity in food labeling. Everyone deserves to know they are ingesting good, clean, additive-free, health-giving food. Be sure to read Why More Pets are Getting Cancer on page 38 for eye-opening information on the dangers of GMO toxins in our food supply. Let us celebrate July 4th in style with good-for-us cookouts and safe fi reworks (light


shows are a great eco-variation). As we mark the vital import of our independence, let it also remind us that the fi ght for safer and healthier foods is only beginning. Honoring your well-being,


Monkey Business Images /Shutterstock.com


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