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in Provo, Utah, create fairy houses made from twigs, mosses, bark and other natural elements. “Instead of paint and paper, we use nature itself,” says Mike, who encourages others to follow suit. “People enjoy time outdoors more intricately as they look for small items.” Although fairy houses are trendy now, the Schramers started building their fantasy worlds in 1987. Tey’ve authored three books to spark the imagina- tion, Fairy House: How to Make Amazing Fairy Furniture, Miniatures, and More from Natural Materials, Fairy Village and F is For Fairy: A Forest Friends Alphabet Primer board book. At 14, Canadian Evan Sharma, of


Kingston, Ontario, is already an active entrepreneur—his artwork now appears on sneakers and clothes. He calls his company RBLB for Right Brain/Leſt Brain, saying, “To be a whole person, you have to use both the creative side and the analytical side of your brain.” His passion for the environment is particularly expressed in a painting he do- nated to support the Olympic team. Painted at an elevation of 7,000 feet on Sun Peaks, in British Columbia, he finished with snow for authenticity and texture. Tis year, he spoke on creativity at the 6 Under 16 program, in Montreal. “Eco-art makes an impact on the


world,” says John Sabraw, professor of art and chair of painting + drawing at Ohio University, in Athens. “Right now, my paintings are round. People say they see a long view of the planet or what’s seen through a microscope. Every painting evokes a different emotional response from the viewer.” All Sabraw’s paintings use pigments processed out of polluted streams, oſten mixed with other standard artist colors. Sabraw has helped develop several ways


for artists to adopt sustainable practices. See his TedxTalk at Tinyurl.com/SustainableArtist. He points out that whatever form eco-art takes, its purpose is to show a problem, pro- voke a response and ask the viewer, “What if…?”


Connect with the freelance writer via AveryMack@mindspring.com.


A sure cure for seasickness is to


sit under a tree. —Spike Milligan


Jump-Start Your SUMMER Cleaning with a Deep-Clean Service Visit from ECOMAIDS.


Our Deep Clean Service Visit follows the ECOMAIDS 64-Point Residential Cleaning Checklist and ensures that everything from your ceiling fans to your baseboards are clean, sanitized and allergen free.


TWO MONTHS OF HOUSE CLEANING $399 Totaling four bi-weekly visits. 20% Savings! Less than $100/visit


Valid for homes up to 2,800 s/f. Larger homes will require a one-time surcharge of $40 for every 1,000 additional s/f (Ex: 3,800 s/f home will owe $40 at time of first cleaning). Each visit includes top-to-bottom cleaning of the following rooms: kitchen, living room, dining room, half bath, master bedroom, master bathroom and all common living spaces. Must mention coupon at time of booking. Limit one coupon per household. May not be combines with any other offer, discount or promotion. FIRST VISIT MUST BE SCHEDULED BY JULY 31, 2018.


SUMMER CLEANING SPECIAL


Initial Service Visit for kitchen, living room, dining room, entry, hallway, stairs, 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom and a half bath.


$159


Price does not include applicable sales tax. Additional fees may apply if rooms are added and/or substituted. Homes over 2,500 s/f will be subject to an additional charge. MUST MENTION COUPON AT TIME OF BOOKING. Limit one coupon per household. May not be combined with any other offer, discount or promotion. EXPIRES JULY 31, 2018.


919-759-6842 • www.ecomaids.com/raleigh Call 503-908-0950 or visit portland.ecomaids.com


July 2018 35


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