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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 31 YEARS EXPERIENCE


SOMETHING DIFFERENT THIS MONTH!


WORDSWORTH HOUSE AND GARDEN


THE CORPSE ROADS ~ALAN CLEAVER AND LESLEY PARK~


Stan Leigh, writer of the ‘In View’ articles for Cockermouth Post recently attended one of two presentations by Alan Cleaver at the New Bookshop in Cockermouth as part of the launch of the new book ‘The Corpse Roads of Cumbria’ by Alan and Lesley Park. Both presentations were to full houses. The routes between Wasdale to Eskdale, Ambleside to Grasmere and the one at Loweswater are included in the book.


Take to the lake at Derwentwater Regatta


If you’ve ever wished you could be a bit more active, King Pocky’s Derwentwater Regatta in Keswick’s Crow Park could be the opportunity you’ve been waiting for.


On Saturday 7th and Sunday 8th July, the National Trust is offering low-cost watersports sessions for beginners in everything from canoeing to catamaran sailing.


With free family activities on dry land and a bar tent with BBQ and live acoustic music on Saturday evening until 9.00pm, there’s plenty to keep everybody busy.


The event is raising funds to help protect Derwentwater’s native wildlife, so it’s a chance to have fun and try something different, all in a good cause. Find out how to book your sessions at www.nationaltrust.org.uk/derwentregatta.


There’s also a chance to see something new at Cockermouth’s Wordsworth House and Garden this summer.


The moving ‘Where Poppies Blow’ exhibition commemorates the end of the First World War and celebrates the role of nature in helping sustain Britain’s soldiers through the horrors of battle.


It closes on Sunday 8th July for a week, re-opening on Monday 16th with a second set of evocative exhibits, including the war diary,


poet Edward Thomas was carrying when he died at the battle of Arras in 1917.


The pages bear an eerie arc of creases created by the shell blast that stopped his heart without leaving a mark on his body. The original manuscripts of several of his poems will also be on show.


During the school holidays, poet William’s childhood home will have a full programme of fun family activities – all free with admission to the house and garden.


On weekends, children can go wild like William and his sister Dorothy with an explorer bag, searching for creepy crawlies in the garden and getting tips on how to create a backyard nature haven.


On Mondays, they can head for the cellar to craft a commemorative fabric poppy and on Tuesdays, they can have a go at making traditional Cumbrian clapbread.


The theme on Wednesdays is wild art – all that’s required is a little imagination, while on Thursdays, families can join a child-friendly garden tour at 11.30am or 2.30pm to taste flowers, touch bugs and discover how to attract beneficial insects and wildlife to their outside space.


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK 


   


 


 


 ISSUE 426 | 23 JUNE 2018 | 48


Stan met up with Alan after the first presentation, to discuss the Corpse Road between Broughton and Bridekirk.


In a previous Cockermouth Post article, Stan asked the question Why is Priest’s Bridge between the two villages so named? Neil Henderson of Eaglesfield, informed him that the bridge was a significant point en route from Broughton, before the coffins were conveyed on to Bridekirk. Alan is hoping to follow up this recent book, with a further edition to include the Broughton to Bridekirk route.


Their Previous book, ‘The Lonnings of Cumbria’ was also well-received and both


books will be useful reference documents for walkers.


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