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ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:JUNE/JULY


A DOG’S LIFE A few weeks ago, we had a customer in the shop enquiring about hairbrushes. Those of you who have been in the shop you will probably be aware that we stock a range of brushes to suit most needs and budgets.


We weren’t prepared for what this customer was going to tell us as he purchased a rather nice £49 Mason Pearson brush. The brush was actually for his four-legged friend which is clearly not common, even for us. He explained his actions by qualifying it with the statement: “I’m from London!” and it began to make sense.


Now, I don’t know why more of you aren’t looking after your animals in this way as it is highly recommended by us and probably most good vets.


AVAILABLE UNDER THE COUNTER Every now and then, I write about a new product or service we are providing. In order for this to happen, we will have had to undertake further training or the legal category of a drug will have changed in order for it to become available without a prescription.


Occasionally, I read about the odd pharmacist who doesn’t go down that route and decides to reclassify a drug all by themselves.


Most recently it was a


pharmacist in London who was selling drugs such a Tramadol without a prescription and was fortunately caught out by a reporter and subsequently struck off the pharmaceutical register.


Being a pretty straightforward kind of person, I often wonder how these dodgy deals even happen. When I’ve previously been asked if you can buy Tramadol over the counter was this just someone testing the water rather than them being oblivious to the rules? Maybe the fact that the person at the counter is holding £250 in cash is the giveaway.


48 HOURS IN PHARMACY We’ve recently had a couple of Bank Holidays and a few incidents occurred that lead to me writing this piece.


The incidents I refer to are ones where the surgery policy of taking 48 working hours to produce a prescription was creatively used to cover up for a patients’ oversight.


We have the occasional patient who turns up first thing on Monday morning for their prescription only for it not to be with us yet. We are then told that they ordered it over 48 hours ago on Friday so it should be here by now.


Upon further investigation it soon


becomes apparent that the prescription was ordered at 11.59pm on Friday and probably won’t have even been looked at yet!


It is important to remember that the 48-hour period is during surgery working hours, so unfortunately Saturdays and Sundays don’t count and on Bank Holidays, you can add Mondays to that too. The best policy to adopt is to order your prescription when you are down to a week’s worth of tablets and not the day before you’re off on a trek to Timbuktu.


Now we’ve sorted out how long it takes for the prescription to get to us, could we be cheeky enough to ask for 5 minutes to do our bit! We can always send you a text to let you know it’s safe to come down, so you don’t have to wait in the shop getting tempted by hairbrushes.


Next month, I will tackle the mystery of the white side of your repeat prescription.


HIP HIP FLU-RAY!


I was delighted to be told that for the second year running we ended up being the pharmacy that administered the most NHS flu jabs in England. When you consider how many pharmacies there are across the country, it shows how big an achievement it is. We even did more than pharmacies in London!


Thanks to all of the support you have shown our service, many of you for some years now and we will be offering a high level of service so that I get to stick needles into even more of you this year.


Nat Mitchell WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK GOING SOMEWHERE?


Our trained pharmacist can administer your travel vaccines* and antimalarials* including:


• Cholera (2) • Japanese Encephalitis (2) £25 • Meningitis ACWY (1)


• Diphtheria Tetanus & Polio (1) £30 • Rabies (3) • Hepatitis A (1) • Hepatitis B (3)


£40 • Tick Borne Encephalitis (3) £30 • Typhoid (1) £85


Antimalarials


Generic Malarone (Atovaquone/Proguanil) just £2 per tablet Doxycycline just 20p per capsule


We also vaccinate against: Meningitis B (from 2 years old) – 2 doses at £100 per dose


Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in both boys and girls – number of doses depends on age. £140 per dose. Chickenpox – 2 doses at £60 per dose MMR – 2 doses at £40 per dose. Shingles – 1 dose at £150


Available to eligible patients aged 40-74 and includes cholesterol check Please get in touch to see if you are eligible and to make an appointment


FREE NHS HEALTH CHECKS Eligible patients include those who have NOT been diagnosed with:


• Stroke • Heart Disease (including high blood pressure) • Diabetes


• Kidney Disease And have not had a health check in the last 5 years.


For those not eligible we have a blood pressure and cholesterol check for just £10 NEW PRIVATE ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION SERVICE


Discreet service provided by our trained pharmacist for eligible patients without the need for a prescription


FREE Prescription Collection and Delivery Available


For further information on our services please visit our website or follow us on Facebook or Twitter


31 Main Street, Cockermouth CA13 9LE Monday to Friday: 8.30am - 6.00pm and Saturday: 8.30am - 4.00pm


www.allisonschemist.com | 01900 822 292 ISSUE 426 | 23 JUNE 2018 | 15


£50 £50


£60 £30


The number in brackets is the number of doses needed and the price is per dose Rabies and Hepatitis B back in stock!


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