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UK POWERNEWS SUMMER 2016 PROMOTING STANDBY POWER & COGENERATION


May ‐ June 2018


EXCLUSIVE: Edina will supply a CHP Energy centre for London’s prestigious Elephant Park development.


Page 18


CRESTCHIC ON NEGATING REGENERATIVE POWER: UKPN looks at the shipping sector & the Crestchic Regen system.


Page 24


UK windfarms produce more power than the country’s 8 nuclear plants


Renewable energy now carried from Scotland to homes and


businesses in Wales and England I


n the first three months of 2018, the UK’s windfarms produced more electricity than the country’s eight nuclear power stations. This is a real milestone - it’s


the first time wind power has overtaken nuclear for a sustained length of time, suggesting that the UK could one day be operating a National Grid powered by cheap, domestic green energy. Across the first quarter of


2018, wind power produced 18.8% of electricity, second only to gas, reveals a report by researchers at the UK’s Imperial College London. At one point overnight on


17th March, 2018, wind turbines briefly provided around 50% of the UK’s electricity. Wind power helped during cold periods, too, supplying 12-43% of electricity during the six subzero days in the first three months of the year. Dr Rob Gross, one of the authors of the Drax Electric Insights report, said: “There’s no sign of a limit to what we’re able to do with wind in the near future.” In December 2017, a new


power cable - the Western Link - between Scotland and north Wales was also brought online, while also helped to transfer electricity from


UK POWER NEWS MAY-JUNE 2018


LOADBANKS for GENERATORS


Scottish windfarms, some of which would normally be turned off to help National Grid to cope with its load. Last year, National Grid


and ScottishPower Transmission completed a joint venture to build the Western Link, a £1 billion project designed to bring renewable energy from Scotland to homes and businesses in Wales and England.


Construction has been


carried out by a consortium of Siemens and Prysmian. The Western Link project includes direct current subsea and underground cables. Elsewhere in the UK, electricity is transmitted by alternating current. to alternating current to enable it to be used within the existing electricity transmission system. The experts suggest that the


the Western Link connection has drastically cut the amount of money paid by National Grid to windfarm owners for that curtailment. The company paid £100m


in 2017 for curtailment. This year payments are already down by two-thirds. Emma Pinchbeck, the executive director at industry group RenewableUK, said: “It is great news for everyone that, rather than turning turbines off to manage our ageing grid, the new cable instead will make best use of wind energy.”


EUROTUNNEL PICKS GE POWER’S GRID SOLUTIONS: It will now build a Static Synchronous Compensator (STATCOM) for Folkestone.


Page 30


 


  T: +44 (0)1283 531645 F: +44 (0)1283 510103 


 www.crestchicloadbanks.com


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