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52 EXTERNAL ENVELOPE


EQUITONE Facade Materials; Designed by Architects for Architects


QUITONE facades evoke the unique nature of fibre cement – a mineral composite material with outstanding physical and aesthetic properties. EQUITONE fibre cement facade materials


E


meet the reaction to fire classification A2-s1, d0 and have a life expectancy of at least 50 years.


Striking aesthetics EQUITONE’s versatility provides architects with the ability to bring inspirational designs to life. Offering a range of finishes such as EQUITONE [linea], which is a great tool for architects who want to play with texture, light and shadow. Its unique 3D shape with routed lines gives a striking final effect, particularly when cut into unusual shapes.


Restaurant Il Capriani Mechelen EQUITONE [tectiva] offers elegant shades


of natural colour which provides a unique aesthetic effect. Characterised by the fine sanded lines and naturally occurring hues within the material, these enhance the natural matt appearance which comes to life with the


effects of light and shade. Request your complimentary samples at www.equitonefacade.co.uk


01283 722588 www.equitone.co.uk


Clerkenwell and Technologiewerkstatt Architect Roth Architekten


EQUITONE’s most recent addition


to the range, EQUITONE [materia], accentuates the beauty of fibre cement. The material encompasses the characteristics of cement whereas the fibres render its surface textured yet velvety. The ever-changing atmosphere gives the material natural subtle shade variations.


Ashton College


Meldrum Hotel


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF APRIL 2018


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