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30 PROJECT REPORT: COMMERCIAL & WORKPLACE ENVIRONMENTS


BRONZE SPIRAL


The Pantry provides the first glimpse of the twisting bronze step ramp, as well as the aluminium petal-festooned ceiling All images © James Newton


the clusters was that “you can spin round, have a quick meeting and spin back to your desk.”


PROJECT FACTFILE


Site area: 1.3 ha Floor area: 1.1 million ft2 and cafe space)


(office


Number of workstations: 6,700 Volume of stone used: 84,000 m3 Number of bronze external fins: 450 (600 tonnes) Number of ceiling LEDs: 500,000 Water conservation savings: 25 million litres pa (rainwater and greywater harvesting)


Project savings from smart airflow sensors: 600-750 MWh of power


per annum, CO2 emissions reduced by 300 tonnes On-site CHP savings: 500-750


tonnes of CO2 pa BREEAM score: 98.5 per cent


Despite the fact the architects researched current trends, she says “We didn’t want to be clouded by them – Mike wanted to do what he thought was right for the organisation.” For example, the designers didn’t adopt the hot desking trend, preferring to let staff have their own space, however there are very few meeting rooms, which is more in line with current trends. There are a ‘ring’ of meeting spaces at the very top (tenth) level, under the skylight. As ever on this project, workplace design was evidence-based – around 100 of the desks were tested out in Bloomberg’s New York office. Says Murphy: “In order to deliver this amount of innovation we had to test everything.” They even developed a phone app so people could find their way to their desk – no mean feat with the floors holding 600-700 people, although each floor is dedicated to a different discipline, whether it’s software development or media. In a final twist of innovation, the office floors are made of precisely finished timber strips, each with a fridge magnet-type material on the underside which enables them to be individually lifted for maintenance purposes, and does not interfere with IT because placing a strip back in its position closes the magnetic field.


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Conclusion At the building’s opening, Lord Foster said that once its hoardings came off, Bloomberg quickly became a “working part” of its neighbourhood, with people instantly using its plazas and colonnade. “It was an overnight phenomenon, one minute a build- ing site, the next minute, alive with people and totally part of the public domain.” He applauded the “shared patronage” that characterised the project, with the client investing heavily in quality, public benefit, and sustainability, which has led to a justly celebrated result. “I pay tribute to that civic pride and social idealism, and the extraordinary collaboration between the public world and the private world.” This building, while a temple to finance, is also a shining example of sustainability that reflects a client with a very strong focus on philanthropic actions, and community outreach. It’s a joyful, unpretentious and highly functional place, blending seamlessly into its context rather than loudly pronouncing its arrival. It’s also a statement of belief in London’s global importance – albeit one that was made before the winds changed regarding the UK’s place in the EU. Bloomberg himself and others must be secretly hoping it will not turn out to be a spectacular monument to the City’s heyday. 


ADF APRIL 2018


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