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By Heather Park


FUNDRAISING – Summer fair secrets


Whether you’re a fresh committee planning your fi rst summer fair, or an old hand looking for extra tips, our insider’s guide will help make your fair the best it can be…


E


verything’s clearer with hindsight, which is why we’ve asked eight experienced PTA members to share their tips


and secrets with us. They’ve told us what worked, admitted what didn’t, and shared lots of extra snippets of insight. So go on, get reading!


What is your most successful stall or attraction? Margaret Bent: ‘Our bottle tombola   the teddy tombola and soak the teacher – no outlay and they make around £150 each.’ Penny Lafferty: 


stalls were the barbecue and Pimm’s and Prosecco bar, which raised  £2,586. The bar was so popular that an emergency dash to restock alcohol was needed fairly early on! There was always a queue for the pony rides, the bouncy castle was constantly at capacity, and the prizes on the games stalls almost ran out!’ Lynsey Pledger: ‘The bottle tombola and pint-pot tombola are the most popular stalls, but are also the cheapest to set up. Children take 


With thanks to: Margaret Bent, PSA Co-Chair, Bandon Hill Wood Field


& Oak Field Primary, Carshalton, Surrey (600 pupils) Sam Davison, Friends Chair, Deeping St James Community Primary, Peterborough, Lincs (210 pupils) Penny Lafferty, Committee Member, Simon Balle All-through School, Hertford (1,037 pupils) Hayley Lake, Committee Member, Whiteley Primary School, Whiteley, Fareham, Hampshire (630 pupils) Amanda Loach, PTFA Chair, St Anne’s CofE Primary School, Weston-super-Mare, Somerset (330 pupils) Lisa Newport, PTA Secretary, Marcham CofE Primary School, Marcham, Oxfordshire (144 pupils) Lynsey Pledger, Publicity Offi cer, St Joseph’s School, Droitwich, Worcestershire (210 Pupils) Gail Roe, Friends Chair, Little Harrowden Primary School, Northamptonshire (210 pupils)





small toys and sweets. We just buy the cups and cloakroom tickets.’ Gail Roe: ‘Our three tombolas are  toys and bottle. The bouncy castle and refreshments also go down well.’


What’s your most unique stall or attraction? Margaret Bent: ‘Last year we paid £200 for a reptile rescue charity to bring along snakes, tarantulas and a giant tortoise. It was a real hit. We charged £1 to cover costs, as we believe the fair is about creating a fun afternoon rather than pure moneymaking, and it was a great way to attract people.’ Sam Davison: ‘A local family always brings one of their horses down with


a trap. We charge 50p a ride. As it  money-spinner for us.’ Penny Lafferty: ‘Last year, the children were invited to construct a LEGO masterpiece. The creations were on display during the fair, and visitors were asked to vote for their favourite design by dropping a coin into a cup next to the build. The cup containing the most money won £30-worth of LEGO – it was a popular attraction!’


How much do you charge for your stalls/attractions? Margaret Bent: ‘Children’s games are 30p or 50p, while soak the teacher and beat the goalie were £1 each, and the bouncy castle and face


pta.co.uk SUMMER 2018 37


IMAGE: MILKOS/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM


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