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FUNDRAISING – Tried and tested


Spectacular events for summer!


Our fantastic readers have shared their stories for a range of seasonal successes, from ice cream sales to a Father’s Day construction challenge


Pop-up restaurant


‘We copied the idea of a pop-up restaurant from my sister, who has organised several. Preparations began three months in advance, working out the logistics of the event and deciding  bags, emails and posters in school and the village shop. We charged £25 for a three-course meal and a drink on arrival. Georgie Harding-Newman, a mother at the school who has


her own catering company, was our chef for the night. She donated her time and skills, and another parent provided all the game (venison, wood pigeon, etc.). Other people and companies  meaning our outgoings were only £400 for some of the food. 


before the event by email or phone, as this gave us plenty of time to order the appropriate ingredients. The event was held at Georgie’s house, and we borrowed


tables, chairs, cutlery and plates from the village hall to accommodate the 39 guests. The event lasted around four hours. There was a great atmosphere, and we received lots of positive feedback about Georgie’s food. In hindsight, we should have charged more for the tickets, as £25 was quite cheap, given the quality of the food. Despite this, we did raise £913, which included wine sales. It was a lot of work for those setting up, laying the tables, cooking, waitressing and clearing up, but the great response made it worthwhile!’ Gemma Douglas, PTFA Member, Hugh Joicey CofE Aided First School, Berwick- upon-Tweed (150 pupils).


Ice cream sales


‘We started our ice cream sales after May half- term last year, planning it as an afternoon treat on the occasional Friday. But the weather remained on our side, so it ended up being weekly! A member of the community donated a freezer


to the PTA and, as we had space available at school, our Head was happy to house it on-site as a place for us to store ice creams. We kept the freezer stocked up, choosing packs


of four own-brand “Cornettos” (in three different fl avours), as well as a dairy-free option of freezepops at 20 for £1.49. We sold the ice creams at £1 (75p profi t) and lollies at 50p (42p profi t). Keeping the freezer


stocked meant that the products could be whipped out whenever the weather was in our favour. The Treasurer organised a fl oat for us in advance, and we had a network of committee members who we could call on at the last minute to help for 15 minutes – the ice creams sold out so quickly the sales didn’t last any longer! It took four volunteers per sale – two on each school gate, poised with a cool box. The Year 6 children often enjoyed helping, too. We publicised the events through Facebook, and also told our class reps so they could share details through their personal accounts. We made around £100 per sale – which was amazing for just a quarter of an hour! – and raised £1,000 over the past school year.’ Jo Caldwell, Member, Friends of Burford School, Marlow, Buckinghamshire (420 pupils)


best-practice Buying


Buying ice creams from a wholesaler, such as Booker, means that all individual products will feature


allergy and nutritional information.


pta.co.uk SUMMER 2018 33


IMAGES: SVITLANAMARTYN; BONCHAN/ISTOCKPHOTO.COM


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