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Sprouting Tips  Always use organic seeds.


SproutHouse.com and Rareseeds.com are additional sources.


 Seeds sprout in water or soil.


Avoid direct sunlight.  Practice good hygiene to avoid


bacteria. Rinse seeds several times a day to prevent mold. Once the sprouts show a bit of green, dry them to remove excess moisture before refrigerating.


 Refrigerate for up to a week for


peak freshness, but no longer.  Use a mix of seeds or one kind at a


time. Discard any seeds that don’t sprout with the rest.


 Sunfl ower seeds produce a particularly high volume of sprouts. get the freshest date possible.”


“One of my favorite sprouts is mung beans, because they appear in two days or less. Birds like the crunch,” says Brooks. “Sprouts are safe to leave in the cage all day because they are live foods.”


Horses When adding sprouts to a horse’s regular diet, it’s important to balance the intake. “A lot of barns feed forage three times a day. I know of a couple that feed one meal of sprouts and the other two of hay,” says Clair T unes, Ph.D., a consulting equine nutri- tionist with Summit Equine Nutrition in Sacramento, California. “Several companies sell systems for large-scale growing.” T e sprouts grow with matted roots in what is called a biscuit, weighing about 18 pounds. Diffi cult to mix with other feed, the biscuits are fed separately, roots and all. “Because of sporadic drought con-


ditions, the idea of growing your own fodder became more popular, thinking it might make forage supply more depend- able and possibly cheaper aſt er initial startup costs,” T unes explains. “Owners


have a sense of control over what the horse eats, there’s less reliance on a supplier and the seeds are less expensive than hay. Due to moisture and nutritional diff erences, you can’t swap sprouts and hay pound for pound. It’s best to consult a veterinarian or nutritionist.” Sprouts contain a lot of moisture and have an inverted calcium phosphorus ratio that has to be accounted for she says. Horses enjoy barley, sunfl ower and


fl ax sprouts for variety. T e high moisture


content may help reduce the risk of intesti- nal impaction and resulting colic.


Good for All


“Sprouts are a healthy form of nutrition and a hip way for both pets and people to enjoy greens,” says Osborne. “T ey’re a great go-to powerhouse of nutrition, oſt en more nutri- tious than the adult plant.”


Connect with freelance writer Sandra


urphy at StLouisFreelanceWriter@mind- spring.com.


PERFECT LOCATION FOR YOUR NEXT EVENT! You Have Just Found the


Health Touch NC LLC has classrooms and meeting spaces in a variety of formats to meet every practitioner’s need, and the Conference Center is available to both practitioners and the public to use for gatherings, workshops, private events and movement classes. The Conference Center provides more than 750 square feet of comfortable space.


Amenities include tables, chairs, massage tables, white boards and markers, student cubicles, CD and TV/DVD players, filtered water, restrooms and convenient parking.


Call now to schedule your tour and discuss how you can in- clude your health care services, holistic education classes and life-enriching events in the wide range of offerings that make Health Touch a must destination for so many health care clients. Learn more at www.healthtouchnc.com.


WWW.HEALTHTOUCHNC.COM • 919.490.4656 HEALTH TOUCH NC LLC • 3500 WESTGATE DRIVE, SUITE 405, DURHAM, NC 27707


March 2018 39


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Benoit Daoust/Shutterstock.com


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