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healthy kids


Step One: Empathize with a Child’s Experience While the desired outcome is to help a child embrace a diff erent point of view of their situation, the fi rst goal is not to come on too strong with an agenda of change. Instead, start from where they are, based on an expressed emotion. Refl ect this with words, a hug or a gesture. T oroughly accepting how a child feels doesn’t neces- sarily imply agreeing or sharing the same view, but it does release them from having to show how bad they feel. So when a child says,


“I feel like I’m in jail,” resist the urge to say, “Are you crazy?” Rather than try to steer them off their course, go in the direction of their swerve to help direct them back to their best self. T e key is to normalize the experience without minimiz-


ing it. Exhibiting too much good cheer means they have no choice but to be grumpy to get their point across. Introduce the idea of choice: “Your thoughts are making you feel really bad. I wonder if there is something diff erent we could do.” Don’t oppressively correct them with the right answer; it makes a child feel bad for being wrong.


Upbeat Kids Five Steps to Positivity


by Tamar Chansky


This is a family master plan for helping both children and adults resist negative thinking.


Step Two: Relabel Instead of being led down a thorny patch lined with terrible impossibilities and accusations, we might steel ourselves to remain calm, get some distance or take our thoughts with a grain of salt. Relabeling begins with noticing a familiar ring to a child’s thoughts and distress; like us, they can also learn to recognize when “Mr. Negative” appears. T en they’re better prepared for discussion. As parents, when we learn to predict, “Yep, I knew my negative think- ing was going to jump to that conclusion,” we can decide to choose other interpretations.


Step T ree: Specify What Went Wrong Don’t be tempted to try to solve the huge problem initially presented, such as, “I hate my life, everything is terrible, I can’t do anything right.” T e goal is actually much smaller, so teach a child to shrink it by narrowing down from some global form to the specifi c off ending


Couldn’t focus. Wouldn’t sit still. Struggled in school.


Aidan’s skills were all below level. After Brain Balance, reading, writing and math are now above where he needs to be. It’s been an amazing transformation. He’s done things everyone said he couldn’t do.”


- DAN G., Brain Balance Parent CALL US


919-851-2333 BrainBalance.com


$50 off our


Comprehensive Assessment *Valid through 12/31/17. Cannot be combined with any other offer. At participating centers.


36 NA Triangle www.natriangle.com


BRAIN BALANCE ADDRESSES: • Academic, Social or Behavioral Issues • Processing Disorders • Lack of Focus • Trouble Making Friends • Tantrums


• Impulsiveness • Learning Disabilities • Sensory Integration • Family/Social Relationships • ADHD


Brain Balance is a non-medical approach combining physical and sensory exercises with academic skill training and healthy nutrition. We identify the issues, then create a plan that addresses your child’s specific needs.


107 Morganford Place, Suite 114 • Cary, NC 27518 1728 Fordham Blvd., Suite 161 • Chapel Hill, NC 27514 Individual results may vary. Our advertising features actual parent testimonials.


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