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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 31 YEARS Love is not all around us


Love may be in the air for some this Valentine’s Day, but many are still coming to terms with the ending of a relationship. The Christmas break often gives couples a chance to reflect on their marriage - the upshot of that is that January and February are peak times for unhappy husbands and wives to decide it’s time to end the relationship.


This is one of the busiest times of year for divorce lawyers and according to the latest figures from the Office of National Statistics, the most frequently cited grounds for divorce is unreasonable behaviour.


What is unreasonable behaviour? Unreasonable behaviour covers a wide range of conduct. It allows divorce proceedings to begin immediately without waiting for a two year separation.


As far as the legal process is concerned, to show unreasonable behaviour, the person asking for the divorce must give examples of the unreasonable behaviour of the soon-to-be ex.


Where I’m advising the petitioner (the divorcer) I suggest picking between 3 and 6 examples and use the first, worst and last of them to show their spouse’s unreasonable behaviour. The space on the divorce petition is small for a reason - the court is generally not interested in the rights and wrongs of why the marriage has fallen apart.


Dos and Don’ts If you’re planning on using unreasonable behaviour as grounds for divorce, there are some dos and don’ts if you want to avoid a backlash from your ex and to keep the process as friendly as possible.


 Do be careful about using the way your ex is with the children as an example of unreasonable behaviour – this is guaranteed to light the blue touch paper.


 Don’t add financial problems if you don’t have the evidence to support it.


Children and money aside, there is plenty of scope to prove unreasonable behaviour:


 Flirty relationships with an ex rekindled via Facebook are increasingly mentioned, as is too much time spent on a phone / the internet.


 Not taking an active part in family life is another good example. Refusal to work or working too much can also be solid yet helpfully neutral examples.


Whatever the reasons for the marriage ending, divorce is a difficult and emotional process, but our aim is always to help couples achieve their end-goal with the minimum stress, delay and cost.


Chartered Legal Executive Vikki Porthouse specialises in advice on divorce and separation. For a confidential discussion about your circumstances, call Vikki on 01900 510366 or e: vpp@burnetts.co.uk.


The first meeting (of up to one hour) is provided at a heavily discounted rate of £120 including VAT.


Expert legal advice on your doorstep


      


  


      


01900 510 366 3c Lakeland Business Park, Lamplugh Road, Cockermouth. CA13 0QT e: ts@burnetts.co.uk www.burnetts.co.uk/WestCumbria


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK ISSUE 422 | 25 JANUARY 2018 | 6


Cockermouth


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