search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:JANUARY/FEBRUARY


> A rather more comfortable room set, reflecting the lives of women who did not have to work, will be based on Crosthwaite Vicarage in 1890 when the Rawnsleys were in residence. Edith was founder, designer and director of the Keswick School of Industrial Arts. Another vicar’s relative, Lucy Gipps, was a beautiful watercolourist and much admired by John Ruskin. The ‘Ant Hill’ (or Aunt Hill) was Robert Southey’s name for Greta Hall. It referred to the three Fricker sisters, of three poet husbands, who occupied Greta Hall with their children and many cats – a chaotic household.


Writing Keswick’s Story will be another major theme looking at the many female writers who have lived in Keswick:


> Caroline Bowles and Mary Barker – artists and writers associated with Robert Southey at Greta Hall (Caroline was his second wife)


Lucy Gipps painting of Crosthwaite Vicarage Watercolour above


> Eliza Lynn Linton – the first salaried British female journalist – born in Crosthwaite vicarage


> Enid Wilson – daughter of George Abraham – The Guardian countryside correspondent for 30 years


> Pat Branthwaite - previous editor of The Reminder


Elizabeth Brownrigg right


> Jane Grave – Pat’s daughter and current editor of The Reminder


Further themes are Working Women, Wartime Women and Community Heroines. Volunteers and partners from Keswick, including Keswick Tourism Association and The Keswick Reminder, have been working with the museum to gather women’s stories. They have searched the museum collections and archive but also consulted with the local community who have nominated women they would like to be remembered in the exhibition via Facebook and community history days.


Eliza Lynn Linton above


We have given people the chance to nominate women who have inspired them - both living and historic - so we have some famous and some as yet uncelebrated stories, says Sue Mackay, the project’s curator.


For example: > Nora Hartley, Ribble Bus conductress and lodging house keeper > Maysie McCambridge, Mayor and founder of Keswick Youth Club > Helen Fox, president of Cumberland County W.I. and Chair of Trustees of the KSIA > Lynne Jones, chair of Keswick Flood Action Group > Sally Fielding who runs Sally’s Cottages from Keswick


The exhibition is part of the Women of Cumbria project: Prompted by the centenary of the first votes for women in 2018, Cumbrian museums have joined with Girlguiding, WI, Soroptimists and Trefoil Guild in Cumbria to celebrate the amazing contribution women have made to life in our county. Each museum has also made a banner with its community partners to parade for International Women’s Day on 3rd March in Carlisle city centre.


Please contact Tara Vallente for more about the Women of Cumbria Project. hello@taravallente.co.uk


Highlights for visitors to the exhibition will include: > Design and make your own Votes for Women badge > Try out the kitchen gadgets of the pre-electric era with poss tub and flat iron > Learn to rag rug in the kitchen > ‘Knit for Britain’ and contribute to the war effort > Figure out how to use a manual typewriter and then move on to the electric version


> Type-set your own headline for this week’s paper or use a dip pen like our own pioneering female British journalist


Thanks to our sponsors, Sally’s Cottages for helping us to tell great local stories!


Sue Mackay sue.mackay@keswickmuseum.org.uk Tel (017687) 73263


WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK ISSUE 422 | 25 JANUARY 2018 | 53


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60