search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
December 2017


www.lifestyles55.net


Nostalgia Radio See inside


Grandparenting is good for you


4


especially on streets and walk- ways, presenting a hazard for the careless footfall. So let’s use our knowledge of this slippery stuff and try to meet it head on. One of our first defenses is to


Coping with ice A


t this time of year, we can’t help but have ice on the mind. It’s everywhere,


get rid of it. We shovel and scrape and use whatever ice mitigating substance we can lay our hand on, from salt to ashes, to sand and, lately, to some new substances. Salt doesn’t “melt” ice. It low- ers the freezing point of water, meaning that ice mixed with salt will have to get a bit colder to stay frozen. When water freezes, the two hydrogen atoms and one ox- ygen atom are bonded covalently (sharing electrons). When ice is formed, the molecules are more widely separated causing the ice to be less dense than water, but the molecules also take up more space. Water expands nine per cent when it turns to ice. Water’s boiling point is also higher than many other liquids because of the


Our love/hate relationship with ice and snow often distract us from the joys of the season. Photo by Joe Crawford.


strength of the hydrogen bonds. When ice melts, energy from heat causes the molecules of hy- drogen and water to move faster. This breaks the hydrogen bonds between the molecules, causing liquid water. The water molecules absorb energy as the ice melts. As for those new methods to deal with ice? Lately, public works departments have been mixing beet juice with salt. Beet


two. You need to pay to play, provide personal in- formation, act right now to benefit, these are some of the other clues.


Scams to watch for T


he phone rings and you don’t recognize the number; that’s clue number one. That the of- fer is too good to be true is often clue number


Scamming has never been more active and scam- mers are always busy during the holiday season. Here are a few of the popular scams in play right now. Reduce credit card interest. Number is 780 525 9008. This is a scammer trying to get you to in- vest some money into their attempt to get a bank to do what you can do yourself – if you even want to. Hang up and don’t argue with them. If you have a call blocker on you cell phone, use it. CRA scams. There are a couple of CRA scams. You may receive an email appearing to be from the


Scammers have gotten more sophisticated, but com- mon sense can help you spot them.


CRA saying you have a refund coming and all you have to do to receive it is to verify their informa- tion with your SIN or bank account number. Don’t respond.


u 5 'Scams' juice is “stickier”, meaning it


bonds to pavement and reduces the bounce rate of the de-icer. Salt bounces at a rate of 30 per cent while the beet mixture only bounces at a rate of five per cent. As well, beet juice lowers the temperature effective of salt from about -10 C to -25 C and reduces the use of salt by about 30 per cent. Of course, beet juice costs u 5 'Coping with ice'


Christmas memories


6


Falls can be serious


Make sure your winter shoes have good grip! 65 falls. A


After a serious fall, older people can suffer post- traumatic stress disorder stemming from concern about falling again and this can result in anxiety and depression – even delirium and dementia. While only 10 percent will have serious physical injuries from a ground level fall, a broken bone can lead to hospital stays where you are in dan- ger of picking up some secondary, hospital–related condition – anything from sepsis to C. difficile to urinary tract infections, all common in a hospital setting. Falls can also result in unseen internal injury that can damage internal organs, internal bleeding and even a splenic rupture. If you fall, be sure the doc- tor gives you a thorough examination and watch for secondary symptoms after you go home. So, just don’t fall.


While it may seem counter-intuitive, staying ac- tive is the best advice. Going to a gym where you can work out with other people provides an op- portunity to socialize at the same time as you are getting the exercise you need to keep your body healthy and your osteoarthritis from becoming too painful. Exercise strengthens your muscles and bones and helps to keep your joints flexible. The first time out, it may hurt for a little while, but as you move, the pain is reduced. Gentle stretching at the beginning and end of exercise will also help. Building strength helps to maintain balance. Bal- ancing exercises help even more. Watch out for trip traps


Every house has them: places where it is easy to trip and fall; loose scatter rugs, uneven surfaces transitioning from one room to another, furniture you have to manoeuvre around; slippery surfaces,


u 8 'Falls can be serious'


fall is serious no matter what your age, but once you are past 65, the dangers increase. One out of three persons over the age of


The magical beauty of Iceland


8


Medipac Early Bird Travel Insurance® for Canadians who know they are heading south this winter


Underwritten by Old Republic Insurance Company of Canada and Reliable Life Insurance Company


1-888-MEDIPAC www.medipac.com


2017EB Medipac banner Lifestyle55 9.875x2.45.indd 1 01/06/2017 10:45:19 AM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20