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ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:NOVEMBER/DECEMBER Donate a book


for a child in need Give them a


HAPPY CHRISTMAS read!


The New Bookshop, 42/44 Main Street, Cockermouth and Bookends, 66 Main Street, Keswick have agreed to collect new children’s books for West Cumbria Foodbank. These will be given as presents to families alongside Foodbank Parcels and Holiday Lunch Packs for kids this Christmas time. They would like new books about the Christmas Story, and/or Activity/Colouring books.


Please give a book and


help to bring a smile to a sad face this Christmas


AND NOW FOR SOMETHING TO DO... Make a Christmas Decoration Katy, Daniel and their Mummy go for a walk A SHORT STORY FOR YOUNG CHILDREN BY CHRIS BOWER©2017


Katy and Daniel have just finished reading a story about fairies hiding treasure in the bottom of a hedge. So, when Mummy says, “Shall we go for a walk?” Katy says, “Yes please. Can we go across the fields and look at hedges?” Mummy says this is a good idea but that they might not find treasure.


The first thing they see is a hazelnut shell that has a neat round hole in it and the nut has been eaten. Mummy says that the hole has been made by a vole (a bit like a mouse) who lives in a hole in the hedge and likes to eat hazelnuts.


A little further on they see a small hole in the bank underneath the hedge. “Look”, says Mummy, “There is the vole’s home.” “Can we see the vole?” asks Katy. “Well”, says Mummy, “That depends on how long you can stay still and quiet.” Katy and Daniel are so keen to see the vole that they say they can stay still and quiet forever. “Let us try then,” says Mummy. They crouch down and stay absolutely still. After a while a little face appears in the hole and then the vole comes out and scurries away.


“That was lovely,” says Katy, “Can we see him again?” Mummy thinks they might disturb the vole if they stay, so they continue on their walk.


They see a red squirrel digging a hole in the field to bury a nut. “He will come back to


find it in the winter when there is nothing else to eat,” says Mummy.


The next thing they see is a low gap in the hedge where the earth has been trodden flat. There is the sign of a path going through the gap in the hedge. “Look at this,” says Mummy, “This is a badger’s footpath. They often go the same way each day looking for food.” “Can we keep still and see the badger,” asks Daniel. “Unfortunately, they only get up at night and usually sleep during the day,” says Mummy.


That night, as Katy and Daniel are being tucked up in bed, Katy says, “Mummy, we did not find treasure, but isn’t it lovely to think of the animals living their own lives and sharing the world with us.” Soon she fell fast asleep and had a lovely dream where fairy treasure turned out to be a small vole, a badger and a squirrel.


To try this you will need: •A sheet of paper •A plate or saucer •A pencil •Scissors •Glue such as a Pritt Stick


Put the plate or saucer half on and half off the edge of the paper. Draw a semicircle around the edge of the plate or saucer that is on the paper. Cut out the semicircle, wrap it round like an ice cream cone and stick the edges together. Make two tiny holes in the top of the cone and thread wool or cotton through the holes to make a loop to hang your decoration.


Now you have tried it and you know what to do, you could use brightly coloured paper like the illustration, such as Mirror Card, Holographic Card or Glitter Card. If you do, then draw the semicircle on the white back of the card which is much easier to draw on. You can get these from any shop selling art and craft supplies. Or you could draw and colour a Christmas picture on the blank paper before you cut it out.


Hint.


1. If you use the card then put the glue on both edges that you stick together and hold them in place with a clothes-peg until the glue dries. Mirror Card is very hard to stick together, so you might have to use sellotape.


2. Fold the straight side in two and pinch the centre to make the top of your cone shape.


3. The easiest way to put the thread or wool on, is to thread it on to a needle and sew it through but do ask an adult to help you with this.


4. You could put a matchstick into the top and add a fairy face to make a fairy for the top of your Christmas Tree, or you could make a lot of different size decorations.


Have fun! WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK Skip2bfit with Boxercise!


This term, our regular visitor Dave Gibson came to school to lead our children in Skip2bfit with Boxercise


too. He’s a great coach, who has a super rapport with the children. They love his sessions and it does inspire them to skip and be fit. This time, staff joined in the after-school session and had great fun. However, we may need to join the children in skipping to be fit on a more regular basis! The children are still skipping every playtime and dinnertime and hopefully Dave will notice a great improvement in our fitness levels next time he visits us. Want to know more about St. Joseph’s School?


Please visit our website: www.st-josephs-cockermouth.cumbria.sch.uk or call Head Teacher, Teresa Readman on 01900 829859


16 NOVEMBER 2017 ISSUE 420 PAGE 55


© SUSAN FLEMING


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