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ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:NOVEMBER/DECEMBER


A Fredericks Voucher


for Christmas? What a perfect gift!


enjoy exciting food & glamorous cocktails! gift vouchers available now


01900 829299 | www.frederickscockermouth.co.uk WILDLIFE IN THE CITY DYANE SILVESTER


If anyone tells you there’s no wildlife in the city – your response should be that they haven’t looked! Leaving aside pigeons, seagulls and rodents, our towns and cities are teaming with nature and you don’t even have to seek out a park or garden.


One of the best places for urban wildlife is derelict brownfield


sites. Approximately 15% of


nationally rare insect species have been recorded on brownfield sites, a large proportion of which are entirely neglected by humans – other than a few inquisitive children!


Some of these sites have a very particular micro-climate: bare patches of soil absorb sunlight, creating warm oases which allow the growth of unusual species. Temporary puddles and pools can encourage newts and rare toad species, as well as horsetail and the spectacular yellow flag iris.


Brownfield sites generally have poor soil, allowing plants to thrive that would, in more fertile soils, be overrun by faster growing


WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK weeds: rosebay willowherb,


as prime development sites, the Wildlife Trusts throughout the UK work with planning departments and developers to try to ensure that species found there are not harmed by the development. This could mean retaining wild areas within the development, or moving species to an alternative place.


So, grumbling


if you find yourself about


some


unkempt patch of city land, or abandoned derelict building stop and consider what a rich oasis it is in fact likely to be.


Rosebay Willowherb © Paul Lane ragwort,


common centaury and even some rarer orchid species such as fragrant, pyramid and bee orchid all take advantage of undisturbed derelict sites. These in turn allow many species of insect to move in, including moths such as the elephant hawk, wormwood and cinnabar which, although not always easy to spot, are quite spectacular.


Since brownfield areas are frequently seen


To discover more about wildlife in your area, visit Cumbria Wildlife Trust website at


www.cumbriawildlifetrust.org.uk


Cumbria Wildlife Trust is the only voluntary organisation devoted solely to the conservation of the wildlife and wild places of Cumbria. The Trust stands up for wildlife,


creates wildlife


havens, and seeks to raise environmental awareness.


16 NOVEMBER 2017 ISSUE 420 PAGE 51


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