search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:NOVEMBER/DECEMBER


STILL BUSY AFTER A RECORD YEAR AT


WORDSWORTH HOUSE WORDSWORTH HOUSE AND GARDEN


THE BORROWDALE HOTEL NEW YEAR’S DAY


10am - 2pm Sally Phillips with one of her innovative Chimney Sheep draught excluders


The last of more than 29,000 visitors have left poet William Wordsworth’s childhood home and the shutters are closed for the winter but behind the scenes, there’s still plenty going on.


Visitor Experience Manager Zoe Gilbert said: “The 2017 season was our busiest for five years but even though the house and garden are shut until March, we’ve no time to relax.”


Outside, Head Gardener Amanda Thackeray and her volunteers are clearing and preparing the ground for next year’s planting, which will include a swathe of poppies to mark a century since the end of the First World War.


Indoors, the housekeeping staff are packing small and fragile items in tissue, wrapping larger ones in dust covers and rolling rugs onto lengths of drainpipe so the fibres can relax.


They will also be checking on their Chimney Sheep, a clever system of Herdwick wool draught excluders invented by local ecologist Sally Phillips. Inserted above the building’s hearths, they prevent heat loss and keep chilly air out during the colder months.


House Steward Rachel Painter said: “We have to keep humidity in the house under tight control to protect the antique furniture and paintings. Our Chimney Sheep not only make excellent use of Cumbrian wool, they keep warm air in and prevent debris falling down.”


In the offices, Zoe is putting the final touches to a packed programme of events and activities for 2018, including a major new exhibition, Where Poppies Blow, commemorating the end of the Great War and celebrating the role of nature in helping sustain Britain’s troops.


Zoe said: “As the home of one of the world’s best-loved nature poets, we’re thrilled to be showcasing this evocative exhibition.”


Former Poet Laureate Andrew Motion


As part of a linked season of evening talks, on Thursday 7th June, former Poet Laureate Sir Andrew Motion will share his love of First World War poet Edward Thomas, author of Adelstrop and read from his own latest work, Essex Clay, a haunting verse memoir. Find out


more at www.nationaltrust.org.uk/wordsworth-house.


For the house’s retail team, 2017 is far from over, though. The shop is open from 10.00am to 4.00pm, Wednesday to Saturday, until Friday 22nd December and the shelves are packed with Christmas cards, decorations and lovely gifts.


WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


Start your New Year in style with our live jazz band. Enjoy a spectacular brunch, including pastries, the big breakfast, carvery meats, delectable desserts and more!


BORROWDALE, KESWICK, CUMBRIA, CA12 5UY


Booking is essential. Call 017687 77224 www.lakedistricthotels.net/borrowdalehotel


Now taking orders for Christmas and New Year Family Butchers & Delicatessen


BUTCHERY Poultry, Beef, Lamb, Pork, Game and much more.


We will also have available Lindsay’s own grass fed Galloway Beef DELICATESSEN


Christmas Buffets / Party Food / Sandwich Platters Christmas Dinner Ready Meals Large Foil Pies, Sausage Rolls Selection of Cooked Meats


Selection of Pork Pies including 1lb & 2lb Salads & Coleslaws


Trifles, Deserts & Cakes and much more... Open 6 days a week at


8 Station Street, Cockermouth, Cumbria Tel. 01900 823143


E-mail: info@wlindsayandsons.co.uk Website: www.wlindsayandsons.co.uk


Visit us on Facebook for all of our daily specials and offers 150 Years of Quality & Excellence


16 NOVEMBER 2017 ISSUE 420 PAGE 49


per adult


£26 £13


per child under 12 years


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68