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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 30 YEARS


MUGHAL TOMB GARDENS ~ COCKERMOUTH PROBUS CLUB ~


DOG GROOMING FLOYD’S


Christmas is almost here and most of us look forward to indulging, celebrating and having fun. As part of the family, our dogs will be enjoying some of the action too. The festive season has a few hidden dangers to dogs, from toxic foods to dangerous seasonal plants. Below are some of the foods and plants to be careful not to let your dog eat:


Food and Drink


• Chocolate – it contains a stimulant called theobromine, a bit like caffeine that’s poisonous to dogs. Never put chocolate treats or presents that may contain chocolate, on or under your tree.


• Christmas pudding, cake and mince pies – all grapes, raisins, currants and sultanas, as well as foods that contain them, are toxic to dogs.


• Alcohol – is significantly more toxic to dogs than to humans and may cause vomiting, diarrhoea, difficulty breathing, tremors, coma and even death.


• Cooked bones – once cooked, all bones become brittle and splinter easily which can pierce your dog’s digestive tract or cause an obstruction. Make sure any leftover carcasses/bones are disposed of in an outside bin.


Plants


• Poinsettia, Mistletoe and Ivy – all are mildly toxic and can cause vomiting, drooling and diarrhoea if eaten, so keep out of reach.


• Christmas Trees – pine needles can cause mild stomach upset if ingested but the sharp tips could cause more damage internally. It is a good idea to vacuum daily and keep the tree watered, or buy an artificial one.


Floyd and I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of our customers for their support during our first year in business and here’s to many more!


We wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!


Lexa Ray


OVER 60 REAL ALES · LAGERS · CIDERS FREE SOUVENIR GLASS & LIVE ENTERTAINMENT


THURSDAY 30TH NOVEMBER


7.00 - 11.00pm


PUB QUIZ NIGHT


FRIDAY 1ST DECEMBER


Live music from COLLISION


7.00 - 11.00pm


Tickets £8 (£4.00 Sat afternoon) Admission by Ticket only, available from: Kirkgate Centre, The Bush, The Bitter End, The Swan Inn, Cock and Bull, Castle Bar and Jennings Shop or email enquiries@cockermouthbeerfestival.co.uk


Spend it wisely Advertising in the Post for


only £38.00 has to be the best value for money


Call Helen or Mike on 01900 824655 or email: info@thecockermouthpost.co.uk


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


Cockermouth Round Table Beer Festival is supported by local businesses including The Tractor Shed, Firpress Printers and our main supporter Jennings Brewery. All proceeds go to Charity.


*Saturday live music during evening opening


SATURDAY 2ND DECEMBER


12.00-4.00pm


Live music from MOJO RISING


& 7.00 - 11.00pm*


At a recent meeting, Frances Burditt delivered a very informative talk entitled Mughal Tomb Gardens, which was devoted to the development and architecture of these tombs, illustrated by four classic examples. She began her talk by describing the origins and history of the Mughal Empire, which existed from 1526 to 1858. Frances explained how Babur the founder of the Mughal Empire ruled a dynasty from 1526 to 1530, an empire which eventually conquered most of the Indian subcontinent. During this time of Mughal rule, architecture and art prospered, resulting in a multitude of beautiful monuments being constructed, such as the Islamic gardens of the Middle Ages. These walled gardens had a rigid formality, with much of the design being of Persian origin. Babur and his descendants had many such gardens constructed throughout the Mughal dynasty.


Frances explained how the design of the garden tombs seemingly part religious and part secular, was an original idea of the Mughals’ and was


formalised into symmetrical squares, criss-crossed by


decorative water channels. She demonstrated how successive designs by Babur’s’ descendants maintained this symmetry, whilst evolving their own distinctive styles. She illustrated how many tombs exhibited recurring artistic symbols and recurring architectural


features, although each one having its own unique style. It was interesting to learn how the Mughal Empire was very eclectic in adopting ideas from a range of countries and religions. Her photographs clearly showed such patterns throughout its existence.


appearing


The development of these garden tombs leads ultimately to an outstanding climax in the construction of the Taj Mahal, familiar to us all. This fascinating talk gave a clear picture of the origins and evolution of these grandiose tomb gardens. A hearty vote of thanks was given by President John Dempster.


Mike Rooney


Any gentlemen interested in joining Probus, please email, cockermouthprobus@googlemail.co


KIRKGATE CENTRE Cockermouth


at the


16 NOVEMBER 2017 ISSUE 420 PAGE 48


2017


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