search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 30 YEARS


FAMILY FUN, CAKE AND CONVERSATION AT


WORDSWORTH HOUSE WORDSWORTH HOUSE AND GARDEN


THOUGHT FOR THE MONTH


Opening wide the doors of the ‘barns’ of our churches


Recently, I read of the death of a millionaire playboy in his Californian mansion. Having revelled in a luxury lifestyle, he was now having to leave all his riches behind. Jesus told a similar story about another rich man who farmed very fertile soil and so kept experiencing abundant harvests (Luke 12:16- 21). However, rather than being generous with his wealth, he would simply build bigger and bigger barns and store each harvest away, planning to enjoy himself on the riches gained from his crops: right up to his sudden, unexpected death. So, he never realised his self-centred plans!


National Trust countryside manager Penny Webb


The open season is almost over at Wordsworth House and Garden but there’s still time to visit the intriguing Bowder Stone exhibition, have some family fun during half-term and take in a fascinating evening talk.


Objects of Celebrity #1 The Bowder Stone explores the rise and fall of this iconic attraction, marketed to early tourists as ‘the biggest rock in the world’. See a replica made from cake, view stereographic images with 3D glasses and find out how the stone might look today, if the National Trust hadn’t taken it into its care.


Visitors also have until Sunday 29th October to head down the Borrowdale Valley to the old climbers’ hut housing the Trust’s Time Machine temporary installation and get a glimpse of past centuries from the stone’s perspective.


Back in Cockermouth, there’s a full programme of family activities at the poet’s childhood home from Saturday 21st to Sunday 29th October. At the weekends, young visitors can go wild like William and his sister Dorothy with a Dumbledore and Horniegoggle explorer bag, hunt for surprising creatures in the house and garden and get tips on turning their backyard into a nature haven.


On Monday, they can have a go at making traditional Cumbrian clapbread, while Tuesday is wild art day – all they need to bring is their imagination.


At 7.30pm on Tuesday 24th October, National Trust countryside manager Penny Webb will be sharing highlights of her career in conservation. Tickets for her talk, A Life in the Landscape, cost £5.00 each and include coffee and cake. Call 01900 824805 to reserve a seat.


Drop-in on Wednesday to write a letter with quill and ink then seal it with wax. On Thursday and Friday, get cosy by the kitchen fire at 11.30am or 2.30pm to hear the costumed servants tell some of the ghostly tales the Wordsworth’s might have enjoyed. Stories suitable for age seven and above.


Wordsworth House and Garden closes for the winter on Sunday 29th October but the shop is open Wednesday to Saturday until 23rd December, so there’s plenty of time to pop in for some lovely Christmas gifts.


If you’d like to be part of the Wordsworth House and Garden team for 2018, visit www.nationaltrustjobs.org.uk in early November.


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK At Burgh by Sands


Our next walk will be to Cogra Moss from Felldyke [GR084197] near Lamplugh on Saturday 28th October. This will be a short walk when forestry operations, mining and local bird life will be featured.


Meet at Felldyke Car Park at 10.00am, or at Christ Church, Cockermouth at 9.20am to car share


Travel directions to Felldyke [distance 19 OCTOBER 2017 ISSUE 419 PAGE 52


approximately 9 miles] - take A5086 to Crossgates, then turn left to Lamplugh and then right towards Croasdale and Ennerdale. Felldyke Car Park is on the left near a group of cottages.


Wear appropriate outdoor clothing.


For more information or details, please telephone 01900 828821 or email seleighwanadoo@yahoo.com


Chewing over this tale, I wondered whether even Jesus’ followers today, often fall into the trap of keeping the good things, which we have been given, stored away from the wider community? Might the walls and roofs of our local church buildings become like that rich farmers barns? Much as praising God remains important, might we focus too exclusively on simply gathering inside our churches to worship each week?


If participation in Sunday worship is the only expression of our Christian life, we may well be reflecting the rich farmer in Jesus’ parable! Instead, we should be modelling God’s love and generosity by better sharing the good


things God has given us. Firstly, we need to re-order the life of our church communities to be more welcoming, attractive and assessible to many others. Then, we need to re-order our ‘7 days every week’ Christian lives, in ways which allow us to share the good gifts of God abroad, so blessing the wider community. Inspired by the recent launch of our ‘Grasmoor Mission Community’ (see: http://cockermouthareachurches.org.uk/mc/), many are now discerning how our church – or barn – doors can be flung wide open, so good things, once stored away can burst out to bless others.


Many Cumbrian churches are capturing such a vision: For four Christian denominations ‘God for All’ is its name. You can read all about it online at:


http://www.godforall.org.uk/.


Our prayer is that in the years ahead, we, unlike that rich farmer, will become ever more confident and disciplined in sharing God’s love and generosity with our wider local communities, so watch this space!


Revd Adrian Thompson, Team Vicar, Cockermouth Area Team


CHURCHES TOGETHER IN COCKERMOUTH AREA WALKING GROUP


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68