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ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:OCTOBER/NOVEMBER


NICK UNCORKED! Prosecco move over there is a new kid on the block!


Fizz is made all over the world in two different ways. The Champagne method and the cheaper Charmat method. The


Champagne method, means the wine has been pressured in the bottle by a secondary fermentation brought on by the addition of a small dosage of sugar and yeast. The Charmat method, is a bulk system where the secondary fermentation takes place in a large tank. The wine is then bottled under pressure.


We are always on the look- out for new and exciting fizz and I think we might have just found it! Pignoletto – the name alone is enough – in this case presented in a very smart dumpy bottle with a very classy label. So, all this a very good start but what is in the bottle?


Pignoletto is a grape variety


produced between Modena and Bologna, an area more famous for Ferrari cars than wine. Originally from Emilia, just down the road, Pignoletto is also known as Grechetto Gentile. References to this variety go back to


the 1st Century BC, when it was cited by Plinio del Vecchio, it was recognised as the second DOCG of Emilia-Romagna in 2010. So, it is historic on the one hand and recently recognised to have real quality.


The grape Pignoletto produces real aromas of apple, pear and light floral notes. The wine is straw coloured with green highlights but the real surprise comes on the palate, bright clean acidity with such a refreshing finish, the experience is all about freshness and light flavours. The fruit brings a light sweetness, making this wine a real alternative to Prosecco.


Produced by Villa Cialdini, the main house of Azienda Agricola Castelvetro owned by the Chiarli family since 1860. he wine is made from clones of Pignoletto that are directly traceable to the Grechetto Gentile variety that was introduced to the area in 1400 AD.


The vineyards at Villa Cialdini


The point is, that here we have a wine that is easily


linked to history, made from an individual vintage (2015) by a quality producer with a real pedigree. £14.00 a bottle? Can’t be bad!


Nick Shill OF COCKERMOUTH


Wine Merchants, Delicatessen, Café Bar 01900 826427


11 South Street, Cockermouth, CA13 9RU


COCKERMOUTH MARKET NEWS


Your local Country Market now has an Italian connection, with the addition of Alessandro to our baking team. His breads and pizzas (and lots more besides) are truly delicious and a little taste of Italy. Do visit us on Friday mornings to see for yourself and meet the baker!


We are all busy making mincemeat, Christmas cakes and puddings, ready for the upcoming festive season. The nimble fingers of our crafts-people have been very active, preparing a wide range of gifts for all ages and decorations for any home. We’re offering our ‘Hamper Service’: you choose what you want, we wrap it for you. As you already know that homemade tastes best, why not place your orders with us now.


Email cockermouthcountrymarket@gmail.com or call in on a Friday between 9.00am and 12.30pm


EMBLETON COMMUNITY HALL


Looking for a Hall for a Wedding, Birthday or Seminar?


PUMPKIN ALERT


You can tell its autumn because it’s got suddenly colder, windier, I’m roasting a load of vegetables each day and I’ve started thinking about Christmas. That is not in my nature. I don’t like to do it much before 1st December but sometimes you have to plan ahead.


Other retailers placed their


Christmas orders months ago. Thankfully, we don’t have to do that. We just need to think about a few things like staff outings.


Last year, we had a glorious autumn with plenty of sunshine and just a few days of blustery weather. It meant that the leaves kept on the trees for weeks and weeks and the displays of gold, yellow and red were outstanding. At the time of writing, we are still awaiting our first frost, our first really foggy morning and our first hint of snow on the fell tops.


It’s the time of year for squashes and pumpkins. Halloween is almost upon us and I’m sure quite a few people will be cutting faces into those massive orange pumpkins you get at this time of year. That’s probably


WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


the best thing to do with them. Flavour often gets sacrificed in place of volume. Smaller pumpkins and squashes taste better.


You can do a lot with a pumpkin. You can make soup, mash them, roast them or turn them into a sweet pie. They are very versatile. I think pumpkin soup is definitely one of my favourites. It’s like all the flavours of autumn in a bowl. We just roughly chop up the pumpkin and put to one side. Fry off an onion and add the pumpkin. Stir for a few minutes then add milk and a little stock. Bring to the boil then simmer for about 25 minutes. Season and blend to a smooth consistency. Add a little nutmeg on top just to set it off. It really can’t be beaten.


• Fully equipped kitchen able to cater for 100 people


• Disabled access and facilities • Sound & Loop systems • £9.00 per hour


Enquiries & Bookings Contact Chris 01768776697


www.embletonparish.com Embleton & District Community Hall Trust are Big lottery funded


Life is better with bread and coffee


40 Challoner Street Cockermouth CA13 9QU


01900 824474


Andy and Angela The Coffee Kitchen


www.facebook.com/thecoffeekitchen www.twitter.com/thecoffkitch


13-15 Market Place Cockermouth CA13 9NH


01900 821599 Join us on Facebook and Twitter


www.facebook.com/thecoffeekitchenbakery www.twitter.com/theckbakery


19 OCTOBER 2017 ISSUE 419 PAGE 45


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