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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 30 YEARS


MOTORING NEWS


It will not have escaped your attention that the recent government directive aimed at replacing petrol and diesel cars with those arguably more environmentally friendly has sent the automotive industry into a spin.


Also in 2018 we’ll see Jaguar’s I-Pace electric SUV which is set to rival Tesla’s huge and falcon-winged Model X which has a range of some 240 miles. BMW has seen success with its somewhat austere i3 which is now been uprated to afford a range of 114 miles.


The most recognised electric cars to date apart from the Nissan Leaf are the Renault Zoe supermini, which has a range of 110 miles, Kia Soul EV and the Tesla Model S sports saloon with its 200 miles plus range. There’s much more to come over the coming months to include an all-electric MINI while Volkswagen plans an electric campervan which is to be known as the new generation Microbus to join its e-Up! and e-Golf which are already on sale.


Renault Zoe PHOTO © RENAULT PRESS


Volvo and other marques have stated they’ll be soon be building only electrified vehicles in the form of hybrids, range- extenders and battery only. Diesel cars will eventually become obsolete while petrol has more of a future, particularly as engines are now so refined they can be truly economical despite their often very modest capacity. Manufacturers have lost no time in offering scrappage schemes to entice motorists to part with their older vehicles, the downside being there’ll be a shortage of relatively inexpensive used cars.


Despite big leaps in battery and charging technology, car makers still have an uphill task in addressing issues over of ‘range anxiety’ and convincing motorists that opting for an electric car can be a practical proposition. Next year Nissan will unveil the second generation Leaf which boasts a claimed range of 234 miles, which in real life amounts to 190-200 miles.


In the short term, hybrids and range extenders promise to spearhead the electric vehicle market with cars such as the new MINI Countryman and Hyundai’s Ioniq. BMW’s i8 sports car is proof of hybrid technology in the supercar league while Toyota and Lexus have enjoyed this engineering for many years, as has


Volvo, its latest model being the new XC60 T8 Twin Engine 4x4 SUV, and Mitsubishi with its award winning Outlander plug-in hybrid.


Tesla with falcon wing rear doors PHOTO © M.BOBBITT


The up and coming game changer in the electric car market is the new Tesla Model 3 hatchback which can be specified in either of two range options, 220 or 310 miles, and which can be recharged at Tesla or other superchargers within 20-30 minutes. Production has commenced but


BMW i8 PHOTO © M.BOBBITT


it is estimated right hand drive models for the UK market will not be available until 2019. The price tag for this BMW 3 Series size vehicle is said to be in the region of £20,000, but we’ll just have to wait to see how good the car really is.


In the meantime rest assured that car makers will be offering customers some tempting if not electrifying new cars!


Malcolm Bobbitt www.wheelspinautomedia.co.uk


BMW i3 interior INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


BMW i3 PHOTO © BMW PRESS 19 OCTOBER 2017 ISSUE 419 PAGE 42


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