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ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:OCTOBER/NOVEMBER


THE WONDERFUL AND COMPUTERS


WORLD OF DIGITAL “Have you tried switching it off and on again?”


Each time I say that, I want to slap myself but so often it’s the logical thing to do if something isn’t working. There’s a huge variation in how my customers use their computers/technology; some switch it all off at the wall at night, others just turn the router off and some, including me, never switch anything off at all. The basic rule is it’s better NOT to switch your technology on and off too often:


Switching most hardware on and off repeatedly causes thermal stress of the components when a device is switched on. The effect of going from cold (room temperature to operating temperature), around 30 to 40 degrees, causes the components to expand and shrink as they warm up and then cool. This causes tiny stress fractures in the metal and components which over time, can cause them to fail


When it comes to your router, it can be necessary to power it off. For example if you aren’t getting your emails and can’t surf the internet, in this instance switching it off and back on helps the router re-negotiate its connection with the broadband server and this can sometimes be a quick fix to what looks like a bigger issue.


So what about your computer? In simple terms, leaving your computer on all the time is less stressful for the machine. Every time a computer powers on, it can shorten the computer’s lifespan. The risks are greater the older your computer, since a traditional hard disk drive (HDD) has moving parts, whereas a more modern solid state drive (SSD) doesn’t and is far more robust as a result. Switching off your monitor and putting your PC to sleep will often save you more on electricity.


If you regularly use your computer, shutting down can be extremely inconvenient. Before you shut down, you need to save your work. The next time you go to start it up, you have to sit through the boot-up process, manually reopen all the programs you were using and the documents you were editing.


Your computer is generally set to do operating system updates during the night, these will download if your computer is on and even asleep but not if it is shut down, which means next time you switch on and the computer checks for updates it will start updating and clog up your bandwidth and processor as it tries to carry out the update whilst you try to work.


What works best for you will depend on your usage habits and personal situation, if you need advice do drop me a line.


David Jeffries 016973 61066 • dj@ministryofdoing.co.uk Solving People’s Digital Problems


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WWW.THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK 19 OCTOBER 2017 ISSUE 419 PAGE 11


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