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THE GREENSBORO TIMES Greensboro, North Carolina


Free Vol. 1 No. 142


The African-American Voice-“Setting the Record Straight” greensborotimesonline.com


Why did Jennifer Roberts lose? The reasons aren’t hard to find.


BY JIM MORRILL


was the two-year accumulation events that


Mayor Jennifer Roberts.


Mayor Jennifer Roberts. protests From a


showdown with the General


Assembly over LGBT rights to nights of street


to a fraught relationship


with police, it all led to what one Democrat called “Jennifer fatigue.”


“I don’t think many people think the last couple years have gone well under her,” said DeWitt Crosby, an active Democrat and retired psychologist.


Roberts lost Tuesday’s Democratic primary to Mayor Pro Tem Vi Lyles by nearly 3,400 votes, or 10 percentage points. Lyles goes on to face Republican council member Kenny Smith in November.


Reasons for the mayor’s loss aren’t hard to find:


▪ Roberts found herself up against a suddenly reinvigorated Black Political Caucus, violence.


focused by last fall’s street


▪ She lost support among many white progressives, who saw her as increasingly divisive or ineffective. During the protests over the fatal Keith Lamont Scott shooting by a Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer, she disappointed those who found her either too supportive of police or not supportive enough.


Charlotte Mayor > page 4


North Carolina Has 6 Black Female Police Chiefs


BY LILLY WORKNEH


Six black women currently hold the title of police chief in North Carolina,


marking


the first time this has happened in state history, according to WRAL.


them are


Among Raleigh’s


Cassandra Deck- Brown, Durham’s C.J.


Davis,


Morrisville’s Patrice Andrews and Fayetteville’s Gina Hawkins, all of whom spoke to the local station last week about their experiences being women of color in leadership positions within the force. The women opened up about what’s it like being in the male-dominated field and the obstacles they’ve overcome. Women only make up 13 percent of the police force in America, according to the National Center for Women and Policing.


“We’ve broken a glass ceiling,” Deck-Brown told


WRAL’s Lena Tillett. “So, becoming chief, the honor is knowing that somebody else has that opportunity to get there.”


The women, who said they often feel the need to do more to prove their abilities to men who may doubt them, have over 100 years of experience among them. Andrews, who was sworn in to her position in Morrisville last year, was the fourth black female police chief appointed in her Black Female > page 14


In the end, it of


fell


like an avalanche on


Charlotte September 2017


© Copyright 2017 The Greensboro Times


Sharpton, Clergy Push for Social Activism, Blast Trump Presidency


BY DOROTHY ROWLEY (THE WASHINGTON INFORMER)


WASHINGTON, D.C.—Thousands of people, including a cadre of faith leaders from the Reconciled Church Movement (RCM), that represents various faith- based communities, joined the Rev.


Al


Sharpton and members of his nonprofit National Action Network (NAN) in Washington, D.C. to rebuke President Donald Trump and recommit themselves to the fight for social and economic justice.


The longtime civil


rights activist said the turnout of about 3,000 people, who participated in the Ministers March for Justice marked one of the largest- ever interfaith gatherings in protest of racism in America.


Rabbi Hannah Goldstein (second left), Rev. Marquez Ball, Martin Luther King III, Rev. Al Sharpton, Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, Elijah Coles Brown and Rabbi Jonah Pesner lock arms in song in front of the Department of Justice at the conclusion of the 1,000 Ministers’ March for Justice in D.C. on Aug. 28. (E Watson/EDI Photos)


“[Just] as [Martin Luther King Jr.] marched for 54 years ago, we are still marching for voting rights, health care, criminal justice reform and economic justice,” said Sharpton, who marched Monday alongside the likes of Martin Luther King III.


Social Activism > page 4


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