search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 30 YEARS LAKELAND PAVING DRIVEWAY & PATIO SPECIALISTS


•Driveways•Patios•Paths• •Walling•Fencing•Turfing•


Neil Ritson 07793 135012 • 01900 823368


CONSERVATORIES & WINDOWS


Your Local Craftsman at Competitive Prices with over 25 years experience!


CONSERVATORIES • WINDOWS DOORS • PORCH GUTTERING FASCIAS AND SOFFITS


FAILED UNIT DOUBLE GLAZING REPAIRS r


rodthomas COCKERMOUTH CUMBRIA


Covering West Cumbria including Keswick Area


•Internal Plastering • Dry Lining •External Rendering & Pebbledashing •Reskims & Plaster Repairs


m: 07456 814 601 e : plasteringbyrod@aol.com


• DASHING • PLASTERING • GROUNDWORKS • DRAINAGE • FLAGGING •WALL BUILDING • FENCE ERECTING • INTERIOR PAINTING • EXTERIOR PAINTING • CERAMIC TILING • STRIMMING • SEASONAL


Trevor Richardson


Building & Property Maintenance Over 25 Years Experience


m. 07543 588 984 t. 01900 812697


trevor.richardson123@gmail.com


Guaranteeing work to the highest standards •Free Estimates•Free Advice


For a professional and reliable service please call


T.01900 828164 M.07706 931 505 email: lakelandpaving@hotmail.com


COCKERMOUTH ALLOTMENT & GARDEN ASSOCIATION


Gardens are beginning to show the colours of autumn and the work of preparing for winter begins.


It appears that autumn is arriving early this year with flowers, fruit and crops coming earlier and lasting a short time. Blackberries have all but gone from the hedgerows and some rowan trees have already been stripped of their berries by the birds, it would appear winter may be early this year, unless we get an Indian summer.


Now is the time to cut back spent flowers in the herbaceous borders unless you want to let some seed for later collection. Cut back Buddleia stems by 50%, to reduce the possibility of autumn winds rocking the root ball. Clear the vegetable plot of spent crops and manure and dig over as soon as possible, the drier the soil the easier to dig. Keep clearing leaves and debris to reduce the places pests can overwinter.


Craig Muller


07990 543 324 / 01900 268 156 othpservices@gmail.com


COCKERMOUTH FRIENDS OF


CANCER RESEARCH UK For donations or In Memoriam gifts please telephone: 017687 76582


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


If you are looking for new fruit trees, now is the time to start your research, so that your new plants will be available bare-rooted for planting in November. Bare-rooted stock is usually cheaper and will establish itself quicker than container grown stock. Fruit trees and roses are usually bought this way. Shrubs and herbaceous plants are often


container grown, as they are relatively small and easier to transport. Some garden centres will buy in bare-rooted stock and pot these on and are often willing to sell these to the public at a reduced cost. The bigger chains only hold container-grown stock as they do not have facilities on site for potting up.


You do not need to have an allotment or a big garden to join us, only an interest in growing for the table, or for decoration, whether that be a very small area, or even in pots and containers.


A benefit of membership is that we get the chance to order at a reduced cost our seeds, seed potatoes and other garden goods from the Kings’ Seeds National Allotment and Garden Association catalogue. Last orders will be taken at our September meeting.


Do come along to our next meeting on the 26th September, at The Swan Inn on Kirkgate at 7.15pm for 7.30pm. We will be discussing all things gardening and taking the seed orders for next year.


We are contactable at cagassociation@btinternet.com


Next Month: Gardening in the autumn


21 SEPTEMBER 2017 ISSUE 418 PAGE 62


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64