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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 30 YEARS VIDEO EVENING KMC


A selection of climbing, skiing and mountaineering videos including;


The Quarryman – E8 7a


Napes Needle with Leo Holding Pitch 15 on the Dawn Wall, Yosemite


Alex Honnold soloes El Sendero Luminoso Ski Touring from the Conscrits Refuge


Aiguille du Midi telepherique winter maintenance iPorter


one man’s dream to be a Himalayan Porter


8.00pm, Tuesday 10th October The Kirkgate, Cockermouth


Non Members £4.00 - at the door only Doors open at 7.30pm. Bar available Enquiries: thekmc@outlook.com


Supporting the Cockermouth Mountain Rescue Team


Keswick Mountaineering Club


Affiliated to the BMC Honorary Patron: Sir Chris Bonington C.B.E. www.thekmc.org mail@thekmc.org


www.thekmc.org


As the swallows start to gather before making their


NEW SPONSOR FOR THE GIRLS! ~ COCKERMOUTH JUNIOR FOOTBALL CLUB U8S TEAM ~


A GIRLS’ football team is ‘heading’ in the right direction, thanks to sponsorship from Cumbria Waste Group.


The company’s adorns


the strips of


logo now the


Cockermouth Junior Football Club U8s team, who play in the West Cumbria Girls Youth League.


The team was only formed at the very end of last season with just six players and has now grown to a total of twelve.


The sponsorship request was made by Mike Blair, who works for Cumbria Waste Group in Distington as a Site Operative and Mike’s daughter Evie, plays for the team.


He said: “There has been a boom in the number of girls wanting to play junior football in Cockermouth over the last 12 months, so much so, that we now have four teams.


“Like any junior football club, it costs money to hire pitches, buy equipment,


football trips and run training sessions, so any help we get is gratefully received.


“I was delighted when my own employer agreed to pay for the strips the girls wear and on behalf of everyone at the club, we would like to thank Cumbria Waste Group for their support.”


Neil Shaefer


SWALLOWS, SWIFTS AND MARTINS long


migration south, it seems a good time to look more closely and them and two other summer visiting birds, to see how we can tell them apart.


There are numerous types of swallow,


swift and martin


throughout Europe but here in the UK we have only one type of swift (Apus apus), one type of swallow (Hirundo rustica) and two types of martin, house and sand, all of which can be easily distinguished. They're all insect feeders, catching their food and drinking on the wing. Our damp Cumbrian climate is perfect for them.


Did you know that swifts spend their entire life on the wing other than when they are nesting? They are largely brown-grey and are generally seen in small flocks which appear to be chasing and playing – they have a wheeling gliding flight generally accompanied by a constant calling ‘tseeee tseeee tseeee’. It's hearing this sound through my open window each year which alerts me to their return from their southern European winter haunts. They nest in holes and crevices in buildings or cliffs and are often found in towns and villages.


INFO@THECOCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


and have much shorter tail feathers. Both nest in barns, cavities, or the eaves of houses in nests they build from mud, which may be refurbished and re-used year after year. They feed wherever there are insects to be had, but largely over open fields close to their nesting place.


Swallows © Alan Price,Gatehouse Studio By Dyane Silvester


Sand martins also have brown plumage, although they have a paler throat and breast and since they nest in holes in sandbanks by rivers or flooded gravel pits you're more likely to see them flying low over the water. They excavate their own burrows which is quite an amazing feat for a 14g bird - that's less than a tablespoon of water!


It is swallows and house martins which are most difficult to tell apart but the two most obvious differences are the red throat and longer tail feathers, or streamers, of the swallow. House martins are black and white


These summer visitors undertake huge migrations, overwintering in southern Europe or North Africa. Given that these little birds also travel as far as northern Scandinavia for the summer, that's a migration distance of up


to 3000 miles! Imagine the number of gnats they need to eat to prepare for that journey. It is perhaps a good thing that their flight is so efficient: they use 50-75% less energy than most of our garden songbirds. Inevitably, many of them will not survive the journey; whether due to human activity, being eaten by a bird of prey, or simply from exhaustion.


So, next time you see swifts, swallows or martins flitting across the fields, stop for a moment


to consider amazing creatures' tenacity! 21 SEPTEMBER 2017 ISSUE 418 PAGE 58


the


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