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IN THE GARDEN


with Alan Edmondson of Bowercot Garden Design


June/July   


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If dry weather sets in, Gladioli will require a good soaking when the flower spike can be felt.


Trim dead flowers from aubrea and saxifrage and clip over other alpines aer flowering, to keep them dy.


Pinch back any plants, such as Fuchsias, Geranium and Cosmos, that are looking a lile leggy.


Give some venlaon to your greenhouse at night, if the weather is warm. Start picking herbs and sow further supplies of dill and chervil.


Thin apples aer the ‘June drop’. Leave two or three apples to each cluster.


 Remove algae from ponds before large masses form. 


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Lupins and delphiniums can be cut to ground level, when flowering is over. Feed to encourage a second flowering. Geranium pratense and its various forms can be treated in a similar manner.


If your bearded irises have not flowered, check that the rhizomes are not planted too deeply. They should be planted on the surface of the soil.


Earth up potatoes to avoid green tubers. If blight is likely to be a problem, spray with a copper based fungicide.


Spring and early summer flowering shrubs such as Philadelphus and Deutzia should be pruned, by cung out shoots which flowered this year.


Cut out all dead and diseased wood on cherries and Prunus species and burn the wood. Infestaons of aphids on water lilies can be washed/hosed into the pool. Li early potatoes as required, or when the leaves begin to yellow.


Alan Edmondson of Bowercot Garden Design, Lymington is a regular contributor to BBC Radio Solent’s ‘The Kitchen Garden’


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