search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
For students who do not have access to the internet at home due to a lack of resources, this can become a roadblock to success. Dr. Darryl Adams, superintendent of the Coachella Valley Unified School district, which serves the desert community surround- ing Coachella, California, decided to take it upon himself to bridge the digital divide among the students in his district, which is among the poorest in the nation. Te district launched a 1:1 program in 2013


in order to equip all of the district’s students with a tablet for use at school and home. But administrators soon discovered that there were students who did not have access to Wi-Fi once they got home, which made it difficult to get any work done on the tablet. Adams decided that the solution to this dilemma was one that was maybe not so obvi- ous: Te school bus, specifically adding Wi-Fi routers to these. With the district covering 1,250 square miles of desert, some students were on the bus for over an hour and he fig- ured they could benefit from the connectivity to get homework done. Te district created the hotspots using Cradlepoint software-defined


4G LTE solutions. Adams also decided to have school buses


park in communities where there was no internet access. “If we’re going to have Wi-Fi on the bus, why not park the bus? Buses are not in use from the time school is out until the next morning,” he said, adding that some students without access would do their homework in the evenings in the district parking lot in order to have connectivity. Adams figured that by parking the buses around the neighborhoods after school was out for the day, these and other students would be able to do their work from the comfort of their homes. Students received training from the district


on how to properly and responsibly use the Wi-Fi technology. Adams said that the district has a great filtering system that enables admin- istrators to know how the data is being used. “We know what’s going on in that system and its mostly school work,” he said. Te district then did research to determine what communities had the greatest need. In the case of some of the trailer park communities, the district had to obtain the support of the


A student of the Coachella Valley Unified School District uses a tablet during the school bus ride.


www.stnonline.com 51


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com