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Celebrate the Queen’s 90th birthday:


There are events in April, May and June, some free, some tick- eted, so plan ahead! May 12 to 15: The Queen’s 90th Birthday Celebration A 90-minute long extravaganza with 900 horses and more than 1,500 riders and performers. The Queen will attend on the final evening. Sold out, but ITV will show the final night live. June 10: Service of Thanksgiving at St Paul’s Cathedral Invited guests only, but it will be televised. (June 10 is also the Duke of Edinburgh’s 95th birthday, but he doesn’t want any public celebration of it). June 11: Trooping the Colour The official annual celebration of the Queen’s birthday, live on BBC from 10am. June 12: The Patron’s Lunch The climax of the Queen’s birthday celebrations: The Mall, Lon- don will become a giant street party for The Patron’s Lunch, with 10,000 guests eating a picnic lunch and being entertained by street performers and circus acts. The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh will take part from a specially-built platform on the Queen Victoria Memorial in front of Buckingham Palace. 9,000 of the 10,000 tickets are for the 600-plus charities and organi- sations of which the Queen is patron, and they may auction off 40 per cent of their tickets to raise money for their funds. There will be room for 15,000 people to watch the event, free, on giant screens in St James’s Park and Green Park. Security will be tight, so arrive early, and bring your own picnic. Many people will organize their own local street parties and celebrations. Check out local media and join in!


Left: The Queen greets NASA GSFC employees, 2007


Hall, to which she makes a formal reply. The hall was first built by Wil- liam the Conqueror’s son, William Rufus, in the 1090s, with the later adornment by King Richard II of a wonderful hammerbeam roof of English oak. It was here that the law was gradually developed in the four courts and from where it emanated across the world. The Queen was presented for her Diamond Jubilee in 2012 with a large stained glass window of her coat of arms designed by John Reyntiens - a gift by mem- bers of both Houses of Parliament which now fills the north window. Following the formal proceedings, the Queen and the Duke met mem- bers of staff in Central Lobby before


36 The American


attending a large gathering with the Prime Minister and Archbishop of Canterbury amongst others in the Royal Gallery. On other occa- sions in Westminster Hall, the Queen has attended a luncheon given by the livery companies of the City of London, the humble addresses for both the Silver and Golden Jubilees, events marking the 300th anniver- sary of the Glorious Revolution in 1988 and the 50th anniversary of the end of the Second World War. Should she make a private visit,


Her Majesty enters beneath the Vic- toria Tower in one of the royal cars and either walks up the Royal Stair- case, or steps inside the Sovereign’s Lift to reach the Principal Floor.


An example of such a visit was the unveiling of an Oscar Nemon sculp- ture of the Queen’s head in October, 2009; this may be seen today in the Robing Room.


Visiting Parliament


Tours of the Houses of Parliament which include the route taken by the Queen at the State Open- ing of Parliament, from Norman Porch to the House of Lords Chamber, are available every Saturday and on most weekdays during parliamentary recesses. www.parliament.uk/visiting


C M Y CM MY CY CMY K


©NASA


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