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Cellar Talk Guilt


By Virginia E Schultz A


number of years ago, I was traveling in the southern part


of the States with my family to visit an old friend. Getting three children there who were then under ten years can be hectic to put it mildly and it wasn’t until we were almost there that I remembered I had for- gotten the wine we planned to give him. Spotting a country store that sold beer, I fi gured that they might possibly sell wine and we stopped there. The proprietor frowned when


I told him I liked to buy a bottle of wine until he suddenly recalled he might have a case or two in the cel- lar that had been left there by the former owner when he bought the store. “But, it’s really old,” he told me as we made our way down some rickety steps. “At least 20 years old.” I followed him through several


aisles fi lled with all kinds of pots and pans and I’m not sure what else until we reached a small room with piles of boxes and barrels. “I was about to toss them out,


but haven’t gotten around it,” he said, pointing to a case of 20 year old Chateau Latour and another


case of Richebourg, my husband’s favorite burgundy. “Those were here when I bought the store fi ve years ago so I could sell them for say, two dollars a bottle.” “Two dollars is fi ne,” I agreed,


almost feeling guilty. “Do you have anything else?” Again, he frowned, then nodded.”Got six bottles of something else with a funny French name which you could have for a dollar fi fty each.” Nodding, I fol- lowed him deeper into the cellar until we came to what appeared to be a pile of boxes and cartons.


Underneath them was a case of thirty year old Romanée-Conti. I bought everything, although


I did feel slightly guilty. When my husband saw the three cases of wine, he almost passed out until I told him what they cost. To be hon- est, that guilt disappeared the fi rst time we opened a bottle and I had a glass. I’ve had the good fortune of having both wines since them, but not often. When I visited this same friend


for the weekend a few months ago, I made him Bourbon balls.


BOURBON BALLS


2½ cups of vanilla type cookies/wafers 1 cup of toasted pecans ½ cup of confectioners sugar (2 oz) 6 tablespoons of Bourbon 3 tablespoons light corn syrup 1 ½ tablespoons unsweetened cocoa 1/3 cup granulated sugar & grated coconut combined. (3½ oz)


Makes about 24 balls


Process wafers and pecans in food processor until fi nely ground. Transfer to a large bowl. Stir in sugar, bourbon, corn syrup and cocoa. With fi ngers, shape into 1 inch balls and roll in sugar/coconut mixture. Put on a large plate and then refrigerate for at least an hour.


The American 47


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