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Top right: Dedham village High Street Middle: Dedham Vale Lower right: Willy Lott’s cottage, Flatford (Inset: Constable, The Hay-Wain, 1821 ©THE NATIONAL GALLERY)


memorative Washington Window, presented by the people of Malden, Massachusetts. The Founder of Pennsylvania, William Penn, studied at school in Chigwell. Billericay has links with Billerica in Massachusetts, and I haven’t even told you about the many World War II connections – many US forces were based in Essex during the conflict. Our next port of call was the


American-linked town (and port - sorry!) of Harwich, the home of the Mayflower. Although often associ- ated with Rotherhithe in London and Plymouth, Port Books from 1609 suggest the Mayflower was originally ‘Of Harwich’. The Captain of the Mayflower’s famous 1620 voyage to the New World, Christo- pher Jones, is thought to have been born in Harwich, and was certainly a key figure in the town for much of his life. To commemorate the town’s Mayflower links, the Harwich Mayflower Project – chaired by our very own correspondent Sir Robert Worcester – is creating a replica of the ship which it hopes to set sail to America in 2020, whilst also creating a permanent visitor centre in Harwich itself. You can visit them in Harwich to see their progress now. There’s a great little exhibition at another nearby landmark, the Ha’Penny Pier, on the New World, Captain Jones, and another famous sea Captain of the era, Christopher Newport, who plied the Pond trans- porting emigrants and pilgrims to Jamestown and beyond.


The American 37


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